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It didn't even occur to me till I was staring at the login prompt. I just booted into Debian, chrooted into Gentoo and set the password there. But it was ...
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  1. #11
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    It didn't even occur to me till I was staring at the login prompt. I just booted into Debian, chrooted into Gentoo and set the password there. But it was a little disconcerting.
    You do have a point. Forgetting the password to gentoo is most easily fixed if you can chroot into the gentoo build from another distro and simply use passwd.

    When Gentoo is booted, if it comes up with a command line, you can log in as any existing user, including root. Alt-F2, Alt-F3, Alt-F4 give you more instant multiple log-ins. I used to log in twice as root, one screen for the commands, and the other to be reading instructions via the nano editor, usually in some crude loathsome font in 640x480 res because at that stage, the whole X-configure point had not yet been arrived at.

    Now, if I must play with Gentoo (who can resist), I do the whole thing from the comfort of a open Konsole chrooted terminal window from within Debian or PCLinuxOS. You can read the manuals and howtos from multitabbed Firefox, or watch Youtube while gentoo compile gobbledegook is wizzing up the terminal window.

    There is a difference between being forced to do all root operations via sudo, as with Ubuntu, and finding yourself using sudo because the window manager (kdm, gdm, whatever) was set not to allow root logins at boot time (as with Debian default). Ubuntu is relentlessly no root user, forcing all root operations to be via a command line. You have to get up to arcane stuff like sudu su. At least with Debian running KDE, you can switch user and start a new session .. as root. For some time, the MEPIS distro used Ubuntu, but with the root user policy knobbled. Mepis is now back to Debian.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gtrax View Post
    There is a difference between being forced to do all root operations via sudo, as with Ubuntu, and finding yourself using sudo because the window manager (kdm, gdm, whatever) was set not to allow root logins at boot time (as with Debian default). Ubuntu is relentlessly no root user, forcing all root operations to be via a command line. You have to get up to arcane stuff like sudu su. At least with Debian running KDE, you can switch user and start a new session .. as root. For some time, the MEPIS distro used Ubuntu, but with the root user policy knobbled. Mepis is now back to Debian.
    You say that as if it was a bad thing.

    I, instead, think that there's absolutely no reason why I would use X as root. Root operations and administrative stuff should be kept as simple as possible. More code, more programs, more stuff, implies always more trouble, more vulnerabilities and a bigger chance to do something stupid without noticing.

    Being that said, you can use root if you want by just configuring everything correctly. If you can't find how, then you probably are not prepared to use X as root either.

    As far as I can remember, kde has an option in kcontrol to become root, and then you can enable another option to permit the root login in kdm. Gdm might have a similar option, I don't really know since I still use my arcane text login :P

    EDIT: By the way, gdm, kdm and xdm are not window managers. kwin is the wm for kde, metacity is the wm for gnome, there are many more wm's that don't rely on a desktop environment.

    Gdm, kdm and xdm are session managers, which is a completely different thing.

  3. #13
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    Ah Ha - the very fellow who helped me out with Gentoo X, for which I thank you.

    Quote Originally Posted by i92guboj View Post
    You say that as if it was a bad thing.
    I, instead, think that there's absolutely no reason why I would use X as root. Root operations and administrative stuff should be kept as simple as possible. More code, more programs, more stuff, implies always more trouble, more vulnerabilities and a bigger chance to do something stupid without noticing.
    Absolutely I do. This has to be a profound difference in personal preference and value judgement - maybe even in fundamental philosopy. I admire those who would go editing and configuring from a command line with X killed, but I am not one. I do not see why a root user should be denied the manifest advantages of having onscreen browser access to all sorts of online reference and help, and at the same time having the ability to mount any device, (say with KDiskFree), open it in a file manager (like Konqueror) and be able to make scripts and copy/paste (say with KWrite or Kate) and open a terminal (say with Konsole) and work in a chrooted environment inside.

    Despite that I am much less experienced at figuring the ways of Linux installs, there is not the remotest hope I could ever agree with you on that. I fully expect a modern computer system to offer the best of graphical tool experience in a secure manner to all the users, including root!

    If some folk feel root operations carried out confined to a narrow mode requiring enormous legacy skills engenders a better feeling of security, thats OK with me, but I will not share the culture. Despite that I remember green screens, and that my first paid for programming job was done entirely in hex using a paper list of instruction opcodes, I do not feel any nostalgia for the "terminal culture". As soon as the technology developed to graphical interfaces, it got unceremoniously dumped.

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