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How in the install gentoo program do I go about mounting the Partition? it says set Mount Point? but I try and /dir(example and it does not want to work....
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  1. #1
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    Okay here is a newbie question, I should be Ashamed of


    How in the install gentoo program do I go about mounting the Partition?
    it says set Mount Point?
    but I try and /dir(example and it does not want to work.

  2. #2
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    You must have root privileges to mount any partition. Are you in Gentoo installation process?

    I would suggest you to go through Gentoo Handbook.
    It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.
    New Users: Read This First

  3. #3
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    Okay thanks will look at the Gentoo Handbook.
    as for your question, the mount point I am speaking of is in the GUI when you go to install Gentoo off of Live CD.
    But either way, I will spend some time in the Gentoo Handbook and see what I can
    find out.

    Thanks.


    Quote Originally Posted by devils casper View Post
    You must have root privileges to mount any partition. Are you in Gentoo installation process?

    I would suggest you to go through Gentoo Handbook.

  4. #4
    Linux Guru Jonathan183's Avatar
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    For Gentoo do a handbook install only ... GUI installer does not work well - and will probably never be high on the priority list of things to fix!

    Make sure you type correctly and don't skip any steps for your first install

  5. #5
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    I found to ease the Gentoo install experience, it was useful to have going an existing installation, logged in as root. Then, from within that running distro, I could make the Gentoo partitions, format them, mount them to a directory created in the running distro, simply copy the Gentoo files onto the partition, and then use the available graphical editors and tools to copy/paste commands from the handbook.

    To be able to have it on the internet, browsing all the help that Google can find, and be able to take your time, leaving it at will, taking it up later as you like, while you set up and learn things, is a great advantage. This can be done also from a LiveCD with root access. A Gentoo install can be put together in an afternoon, but I don't get things right first time.

    Plan the thing. Obviously you need partition space to install your Gentoo. Your existing installation must not occupy the whole drive, or.. you put the Gentoo on a seperate drive. The whole partitioning / formatting bit has to be done beforehand.

    The trick is chroot, which is the "change root" command. You can have a terminal shell window open in your existing distro, and from within it, you can do everything.

    After copying the Gentoo directories with files straight into the partition, you have most of an installation suddenly there. Follow up with the Portage snapshot, and then use the handbook cut-n-paste trick to configure about 15 things. You can extract the files to copy from the CD, or you can download a recent set from the internet.

    Within the terminal window, you can type any Gentoo emerge command, and you can continue to use and browse while watching Gentoo stuff compilation messages flash by inside the window. If you want to try this way, here is a little script that delivers the commands to make the "Gentoo install" terminal window. Before you try it, you need to create a folder called "gentoo" in /mnt. You can use the "new folder" tool in a file manager, or you can use the command line.
    Code:
    #mkdir /mnt/gentoo
    . Also, if you do use it, you need to substitute you correct intended partition name into lines 5 and 6. TAKE CARE you do not end up mounting an existing partition that already has stuff in it.
    Code:
    #!/bin/bash
    #
    #Gentoo setup
    echo "Mounting setup for Gentoo"
    echo "# mount /dev/<hda-sda-whatever> /mnt/gentoo"
    mount /dev/<hda-sda-whatever> /mnt/gentoo
    
    echo "#"
    #
    cd /mnt/gentoo
    echo "Ensure networking still works even after entering the new environment"
    echo "# cp -L /etc/resolv.conf /mnt/gentoo/etc/resolv.conf"
    cp -L /etc/resolv.conf /mnt/gentoo/etc/resolv.conf
    echo "Mount the proc filesystem on /mnt/gentoo to allow the installation to use"
    echo "kernel-provided information within the chrooted environment"
    echo "# mount -t proc none /mnt/gentoo/proc "
    mount -t proc none /mnt/gentoo/proc
    echo " Mount the dev filesystem"
    echo "# mount -o bind /dev /mnt/gentoo/dev"
    mount -o bind /dev /mnt/gentoo/dev
    echo "chrooting into  environment in /mnt/gentoo"
    chroot /mnt/gentoo /bin/bash
    Run the script by making the place you keep it the current directory, and then do ./gentoo. OR - you can of course just copy-paste the commands from the script one by one as you would have typed them. From that point on, just follow the handbook slavishly. Hope this helps.
    Last edited by Gtrax; 01-31-2009 at 10:11 AM. Reason: mistaikes :(

  6. #6
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    An afterthought..
    If you do try this way, as soon as the chrooted terminal becomes available, the very first commands you type are these.
    Code:
    # env-update
    >> Regenerating /etc/ld.so.cache...
    # source /etc/profile
    # export PS1="(gentoo)$PS1"
    Then you can go ahead and play.

    I should also mention that I use the hosting distro tools (Ark) to unpack the Gentoo files, and then simply drag-drop them all into the mounted partition. Its a kind of fast start.

  7. #7
    Linux Guru Jonathan183's Avatar
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    Using a live CD or an existing Linux distro to install from are well established methods, I certainly prefer them to using the minimal install CD. I think copy/paste from the handbook the relevant commands is probably a better approach than running scripts. I would also use the handbook method and tar command to extract to the correct location rather than gui tools (although I tend to use firefox to download the files and then cp them to the right location). It's also better to login as a regular user and
    Code:
    su -
    in the terminal to gain root rights if you are doing this from an existing Linux

    In your script for some reason you have # ... this is the part of the prompt indicating root rather than $ for other users. Since this is also used for comments
    Code:
    # followed by something on the same line
    does not have any impact.

    Glad you have your Gentoo install running

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan183 View Post
    In your script for some reason you have # ... this is the part of the prompt indicating root rather than $ for other users. Since this is also used for comments
    Code:
    # followed by something on the same line
    does not have any impact.
    Jonathan
    You are absolutely right in that there is plenty of potential for mis-understanding here.
    So I shall try to be clearer.
    The script is OK in that the # symbols are comment markers when it is run as a script.

    The final part was supposed to show what one sees in a terminal when logged in as root.

    Nor is it implied that such a little script is how one gets a gentoo install in. It only sets up the chrooted environment in a terminal - from where one follows the handbook.

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