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hello all, first of all let me say im relativly new to linux, had to use it in a business enviroment last year (mail server, zonefiles and VoIP) but beyond ...
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  1. #1
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    hello all,

    first of all let me say im relativly new to linux, had to use it in a business enviroment last year (mail server, zonefiles and VoIP) but beyond that I wasnt able to play around (for obvious reasons!) or learn much beyond what I needed to know. now i've decided to install it on my laptop, on a sperate partition to my current windows os.

    i've downloaded the i686 livecd, and booted from the cd with no errors. however once the installer actually started, all i could see was 3 seperate blocks of the installer, with jagged lines criss-crossing across the screen, basically looking like my video card was on the blink. its not, as it works in windows fine.

    i could see that while the installer was starting up it detected the video card, which is a ATI Radeon Xpress 200, and it detected the resolutions okay too, and yet it displays in this funky way? fumbling around I got into the actual operating system, to go to the display settings and there were no resolution options available.

    i imagen this is quite a noobish question, but i used to only ever use gentoo through the command line, and dont know my way around the graphical system properly, which is made 300 times harder when you cant actually see the desktop.

    any help would be greatly appreciated,

    thanks,

    james

  2. #2
    Linux Enthusiast gruven's Avatar
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    Don't use the Gentoo livecd to install Gentoo. It has bugs.

    Use the System Rescue CD, which is based on Gentoo.
    Main Page - SystemRescueCd

    Also, don't use a GUI installer to install Gentoo. Just boot a livecd, and follow the handbook:
    Gentoo Linux x86 Handbook ? Gentoo Linux Documentation

    Once you get that done, you should be able to properly maintain your Gentoo install that you have just built.

    Linux User #376741
    Code is Poetry

  3. #3
    Linux Enthusiast Bemk's Avatar
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    Maybe if you are new to GNU/Linux, something which has a bit more of a feeling like Windows is more suitable for you so you can start getting used to GNU/Linux. Something with a KDE interface could works a bit like the Windows GUI, maybe it has better support of your graphics card as well.

    You can always play with the drivers and go advanced immediately (like I want to do) but maybe something like KUbuntu is more for you. Once you know enough of the GNU/Linux system you can get going with Gentoo.

    If you have Unix experience though Gentoo might be something for you!

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    hello,

    thanks for your replies. I'm just having a look at the systemrescuecd and it doesnt look like something im looking for, as far as I can tell the problem seems to be directly afflicted with the graphics card, there are no problems with data or partitions on the hard-drive; as I have windows on another partition itself.

    so is basically what being said is that my graphics card is not compatible with Gentoo? if this is the case I will try other distribs, which is a shame as from my short experiance with Gentoo I grew to love it

    does anyone know of any ways to make this work? I mean if it is possible to change the drivers once into the operating system (although it wont be installed, as I cant do this as I cant actually see the text or GUI properly once its booted).

    thanks,

    james

  6. #5
    Linux Enthusiast Bemk's Avatar
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    You can see if you can get some driver modules for the kernel? I don't really know, I'm only planning on switching to Gentoo after a year of experience with Ubuntu. I really like Ubunut but feel like I'm more ready now for a bit more advanced system. Ubuntu just lets you choose a proprietary driver if one is available, and figures out the drivers for you.

    Gentoo will be a better experience for me. I really have a lot to learn about the GNU/Linux system.

  7. #6
    Linux Enthusiast gruven's Avatar
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    Your graphics card isn't incompatible with Gentoo. What I was saying is that you won't need a graphical environment to install Gentoo because you should do it from the command line following the handbook. You won't actually be installing the System Rescue CD, you will be installing Gentoo from it. You can actually use ANY livecd to install Gentoo. I use Fedora's livecd to install Gentoo usually because of their wireless support and ext4 support.

    If you want a distro that does everything for you and you can click through the installer, then Gentoo isn't what you are looking for. If you are ready to actually build your own install, then stick around, we will get your problem sorted.

    You need to find a livecd that will recognize your card and use the correct driver for it. If the installer won't, then you can manually change the livecd's xorg.conf when booted into it, but I am not sure if you are comfortable doing that.

    If it were me, I would just find a livecd (any distro) that will boot, and install Gentoo from that following the Handbook. If you use an automatic installer of any sort, you are already behind in maintaining your install. The command line install following the handbook is the only officially supported install procedure.

    Linux User #376741
    Code is Poetry

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