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Howdy all. Due to circumstances outside of my control, I recently had to wipe out my box and re-install Gentoo. I got through the install happily, but I found that ...
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  1. #1
    Linux Guru Cabhan's Avatar
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    [SOLVED] No Mouse Under 2.6.27


    Howdy all. Due to circumstances outside of my control, I recently had to wipe out my box and re-install Gentoo. I got through the install happily, but I found that I have no mouse. What I mean is that /dev/input/mice gives no output when cat'd, and dmesg makes no mention of a mouse.

    I have a Logitech TrackMan, and I have tried plugging it in via both USB and PS/2. Neither works. When I plug it in via USB, dmesg does report that a USB device was plugged in, and lsusb does report the correct model ("Logitech, Inc. TrackMan Wheel"), but /dev/input/mice still does nothing.

    I have udev and hotplug both installed. I have, in my kernel, enabled CONFIG_HID_SUPPORT, CONFIG_HID, and CONFIG_USB_HID. I also have EHCI, OHCI, and UHCI enabled, as well as CONFIG_INPUT, CONFIG_INPUT_MOUSEDEV, and CONFIG_INPUT_MOUSE. All are compiled into the kernel (I'm not a big believer in modules).

    As an interesting note, my PS/2 keyboard does work.

    I have tried plugging in a USB key, and that is detected correctly.

    Any thoughts on what I can try at this point?
    Last edited by Cabhan; 04-17-2009 at 08:57 PM.

  2. #2
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    Hi Cabhan !

    Have you checked Legacy USB Support in BIOS? Try to toggle it. It worked for me in the past.
    It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.
    New Users: Read This First

  3. #3
    Linux Guru Cabhan's Avatar
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    Heh, my box practically IS legacy (it's from 2003). I checked out the BIOS, and there is a setting to enable USB in general, but it is enabled.

    Some more useful information:

    This mouse worked on my desktop before the reformat. I am assuming, therefore, that it is a kernel configuration or version problem. The mouse does work: when I booted the Gentoo LiveCD to do the install, it was all happy.

    I have also gone ahead and checked out lsusb: the mouse is being detected on the bus, and verbose output recognizes it as an HID device. Interestingly, the device status is 0x0000, with a tag saying "bus powered", but I don't know if that maybe means that the mouse is not being powered? There are no lights or anything on it to indicate that.

    Thanks.

  4. #4
    Linux Guru Cabhan's Avatar
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    In accepting the Idiot's Award for Linux usage, I would like to thank mounting of drives.

    My /boot partition wasn't mounted, so my recompiled kernels weren't getting put onto sdb2, which is where GRUB looks for them.

    Nothing to see here, move along.

  5. #5
    Linux Guru Jonathan183's Avatar
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    Hi Cabhan - time for me to ask a stupid question ... why do you use a separate boot partition ... is it a BIOS/grub limit on your system or do you have other reasons ? With live CDs there does not seem to be much advantage using a separate boot partition to me ... but it causes complication

  6. #6
    Linux Guru Cabhan's Avatar
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    Frankly, I mostly did it for kicks and giggles. As I understand it, the main rationale is security: /boot only needs to be mounted when modifying its contents. Therefore, by leaving it unmounted, viruses/malicious attacks won't be able to actually affect your GRUB config or kernel image.

  7. #7
    Linux Guru Jonathan183's Avatar
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    Root can remount read/write and a normal user does not have permissions to write ... so I thought the security advantage would be minimal ...
    Gentoo handbook still has separate boot partition in the instructions I think ... still struggling with the advantage of that approach ...
    Thanks for sharing your reasons

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