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Is there a way of saving your progress in a Gentoo install, I hate to have to start all over with each restart. Frank...
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  1. #1
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    SolvedHow can you save your install progess in gentoo?


    Is there a way of saving your progress in a Gentoo install, I hate to have to start all over with each restart. Frank

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    Administrator MikeTbob's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by frank56 View Post
    Is there a way of saving your progress in a Gentoo install, I hate to have to start all over with each restart. Frank
    How far have you gotten? If you have followed the handbook, just pick a good stopping point. You can always use chroot to login from another Linux distro or LiveCD to pick up where you left off.
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    Linux Enthusiast gruven's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeTbob View Post
    How far have you gotten? If you have followed the handbook, just pick a good stopping point. You can always use chroot to login from another Linux distro or LiveCD to pick up where you left off.
    MikeTbob is right. The progress you make on your gentoo install is always there unless you format your partition. Just mount your partitions, chroot, and you can pick up right where you left off.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeTbob View Post
    How far have you gotten? If you have followed the handbook, just pick a good stopping point. You can always use chroot to login from another Linux distro or LiveCD to pick up where you left off.
    I got as far as step 7b or emerge gentoo-sources. But I had to force a shutdown, it was stalled on patch config stage. If i boot from a live cd, I have both sysrescd and the gentoo minimal install cd, after booting I type chroot and what else. I could not understand the syntax for chroot. It is :

    Usage: chroot NEWROOT [COMMAND [ARC]...]

    or : chroot OPTION

    Run COMMAND with new directory set to NEWROOT

    I am lost here,. Frank, I can guess ARC is i686, since I have an Athlon 1.2 gig

    Thanks Mike I was making this harder than it was..was having problems because

    I had /dev/hda instead of sda. I went back started at "code Listing 4.1 chapter 4

    of Handbook, gentoo said mkdir already existed. I went on to #mount /dev/hda1

    ./mnt/gentoo/boot I think I skipped over to #mount -t none /mnt/gentoo/proc

    and cont to chrooting into a the new enviroment

    I am back to the original problem,
    Last edited by frank56; 11-08-2009 at 06:59 PM. Reason: New info

  5. #5
    Administrator MikeTbob's Avatar
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    How to chroot Gentoo and other fine Distros.

    Boot a LiveCD and issue these commands as root. First you must create a mount point for the chroot environment.
    Code:
    mkdir /mnt/gentoo/
    Code:
    mount /dev/sd?/ /mnt/gentoo
    Replace /dev/sd? with your correct partition and then continue.
    Code:
    mount -t proc none /mnt/gentoo/proc
    Code:
    chroot /mnt/gentoo /bin/bash
    Code:
    env-update && source /etc/profile
    You are now in the Gentoo environment, just as if you had booted into Gentoo itself.
    If your LiveCD is network enabled, then issue this command too, from a separate terminal window, since you have already chrooted into Gentoo.
    Code:
    cp -L /etc/resolv.conf /mnt/gentoo/etc/
    This can be used for any Distro as long as you get the paths and commands for your specific system correct.

    EDIT:I thin you need to use the AMD64 version if you have an Athlon proccessor.
    Last edited by MikeTbob; 11-08-2009 at 04:35 PM. Reason: See EDIT:
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    Linux Enthusiast gruven's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeTbob View Post

    EDIT:I thin you need to use the AMD64 version if you have an Athlon proccessor.
    Only if you want a 64 bit install. i686 is what you want if you have a regular Athlon processor and want a 32 bit install.

    Also, don't forget to mount /boot and /home if you have them on separate partitions. I have seen people forget that step and not be able to find their kernel after reboot.

    Make sure and mount /dev as well, for safe measure.

    Basically, you want to follow the hard drive section (except don't format this time) for mounting, and then follow the section on where to chroot in the handbook.

    I would suggest using an Ubuntu or a Fedora livecd to do the chroot if you don't already have a linux installed on another partition. That way you can have the handbook up in a browser window while you work.
    Last edited by gruven; 11-08-2009 at 09:06 PM.

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