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Sounds like one of the groups you don't have in your /etc/group You might have a script, that promps you questions, I know in slackware you can use "$ adduser" ...
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  1. #11
    Linux User
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    256

    Sounds like one of the groups you don't have in your /etc/group

    You might have a script, that promps you questions, I know in slackware you can use "$ adduser" and it promps name, group, pass, etc.

    5) Is there a command to find out what groups a user is in? Because I think I am only in the group "users".

    I can play games, etc. just fine without being in that group...
    --monkey

  2. #12
    Linux Guru sarumont's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
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    3,682
    Quote Originally Posted by monkey8
    1) What is udev? does it have to do with USB? I tried to query,
    but i got an error.

    2) What is the group wheel for? Why is it called wheel?

    3) Why is sudo more secure? The man page says the default setting is to use the users password, not roots... Is it because anyone can su and
    guess the root password, but they need to be in a certain group
    for sudo?

    4) If sudo requires the root password, how would that be
    different then If I created a group and made it so only certain users could "su"? Would that basically be the same thing?

    5) Is there a command to find out what groups a user is in? Because I think I am only in the group "users".
    1) Udev is a replacement for devfsd. It is completely configureable in userspace vs. kernelspace. It's quite a bit secure and more configureable than devfsd. You should have it installed (depending on your kernel && distro) by default as devfsd has been deprecated in the kernel.

    2) Dunno why it's called wheel, but it's like the "admin" group on a Linux system. You have to be in wheel to be allowed to su.

    3-4) Sudo is much more configureable than you noticed by glancing at the man page. Read it through and you'll see that you can configure very specific settings for each group/user on the system.

    5) id user
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