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I've been looking at fluxbox.org and see that all of the snapshots aren't run as root. I know how to create another user, but I don't know what permissions to ...
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  1. #1
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    New user for Gentoo and default user for Fluxbox


    I've been looking at fluxbox.org and see that all of the snapshots aren't run as root. I know how to create another user, but I don't know what permissions to give it. After that, I don't know how to have that users X be fluxbox. I tried it before I formatted and got some X called TWN or similar. Also, how do you add fluxbox styles off the net? So far, I've just been running Gentoo as root.

  2. #2
    Linux Guru kkubasik's Avatar
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    useradd qub333

    will add user qub333, MAKE SURE YOU SET A PASSWORD

    passwd qub333

    will set the password. Don't run as root a very bad idea, fluxbox has a varety of default styles, im not sure about the specifics, but im sure there are directions for themes, finaly, edit your ./.xinidrc from

    exce twm (or whatever)

    to

    exce fluxbox
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    Formerly Known as qub333

  3. #3
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    Mmmmmm....what groups? I've been seeing this wheel group come up in some topics.

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  5. #4
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    I made the user but I don't dare log into it because I can't su into root from it.

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    Linux Guru kkubasik's Avatar
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    you can always log out, but add to group wheel in the /etc/groups file unless im mistaken that should handle most of the basics, Ill post a more comprehensive guide to groups later this evening, or tomorrow.
    Avoid the Gates of Hell. Use Linux
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    Formerly Known as qub333

  7. #6
    Linux Guru sarumont's Avatar
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    If you are in wheel, you can su to root. I would advise setting up sudo so you don't have to su. This makes it easier and more secure. As far as which groups to add him to, I would suggest portage, audio, cdrom, disk (for burning), users, and games (if you want to play most games). All device-based groups (like disk and tty) can have their permissions tweaked (to devices) via /etc/udev/permissions.d/50-udev.permissions. Hope this helps.
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    Hey Landus, the specific command that you should use to add the user would be:
    Code:
    useradd your_user -m -G users,wheel,audio,games -s /bin/bash
    Of course, change "your_user" to whatever you want to call the new user. Then:
    Code:
    passwd your_user
    Once again replace "your_user" with the name of the user you created, then type in the password for that user, press Return, type it again, and press Return. Then you can either login as that user or su from root to that user (su your_user)--su from root is not advisable. Have fun!

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    Linux User Stefann's Avatar
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    ???Hhhhhmmmm, does this work on RH9.
    Nothing is worse than ten penguins fighting over which is better, vi or emacs.
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    Finally I'm back on LF after a long while.

  10. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by sarumont
    If you are in wheel, you can su to root. I would advise setting up sudo so you don't have to su. This makes it easier and more secure. As far as which groups to add him to, I would suggest portage, audio, cdrom, disk (for burning), users, and games (if you want to play most games). All device-based groups (like disk and tty) can have their permissions tweaked (to devices) via /etc/udev/permissions.d/50-udev.permissions. Hope this helps.
    1) What is udev? does it have to do with USB? I tried to query,
    but i got an error.

    ==
    # udevinfo -q name
    unable to open udev database
    ==


    2) What is the group wheel for? Why is it called wheel?

    3) Why is sudo more secure? The man page says the default setting is to use the users password, not roots... Is it because anyone can su and
    guess the root password, but they need to be in a certain group
    for sudo?

    4) If sudo requires the root password, how would that be
    different then If I created a group and made it so only certain users could "su"? Would that basically be the same thing?
    --monkey

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    useradd your_user -m -G users,wheel,audio,games -s /bin/bash

    I tried the above cmd and replaced your_user with the name of my user and did this from root and it tells me useradd: unknown group. Any ideas?

    Thanks

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