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I was thinking about trying out Gentoo. Is it Linux or BSD? I've read that is uses port trees I was wondering how that would compare to how Arch is ...
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  1. #1
    Linux Newbie
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    Thinking about Gentoo


    I was thinking about trying out Gentoo.
    Is it Linux or BSD?
    I've read that is uses port trees I was wondering how that would compare to how Arch is done.
    I currently use Arch on all my systems know. I love the configure ability of it. but the updates are kind of a pain because of the lag of my internet. I use satellite internet. I was wondering if trying out the port tree way would work better with my internet. I don't want to go back to other Linux distros I've used because I'll get bored.

    Thanks for the help.

  2. #2
    Blackfooted Penguin daark.child's Avatar
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    Gentoo is Linux. I've not used it (and Arch) for a few years now, but if I remember correctly most packages on Gentoo systems are built from source whereas Arch provides many prebuilt binaries. Gentoo is highly customisable and configurable. If you are comfortable with Arch, I don't think you'll have problems with Gentoo.

  3. #3
    oz
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    Yes, Gentoo is Linux. I've successfully installed and used both Arch and Gentoo in the past, but wound up sticking with Arch because Gentoo was found to be overly time intensive for my personal tastes. I'd recommend trying both distros and deciding for yourself which one better suits your own personal needs and tastes.
    oz

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    It's been many years since I used gentoo.
    Everything is downloaded as source and built locally, so it's a lengthy install.
    Any mis-steps and you may have to start all over.
    The portage system is quite efficient in building and configuring the software. It pulls down all the pre-reqs and co-reqs and builds them also.

    Right now I use openSUSE on 4 x86_64 boxes including an Acer TravelMate 7520 laptop, Kubuntu 12.04 x86_64 on 3 including a XP3000+ 1 CPU x86_64 laptop, Ubuntu 12.04 ARM on BeagleBoard C3 and XM, a BeagleBone and a Pandaboard.

  6. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by electroman6913 View Post
    I was thinking about trying out Gentoo.
    Is it Linux or BSD?
    I've read that is uses port trees I was wondering how that would compare to how Arch is done.
    I currently use Arch on all my systems know. I love the configure ability of it. but the updates are kind of a pain because of the lag of my internet. I use satellite internet. I was wondering if trying out the port tree way would work better with my internet. I don't want to go back to other Linux distros I've used because I'll get bored.

    Thanks for the help.
    It is Linux. There is not an installer program but a document telling you what you need to do. It is NOT for a beginner or even someone with more experience. If you use it, you will need to update the the latest on a monthly (or every other month) as going longer may cause issues when attempting to upgrade. I use it and I like it (other than the need to upgrade more often than I would like). There are no GUI tools for installing packages and the packages are compiled on your machine when installing. The instructions for the install gets you to a minimum system (text based) and at that point it boots and you will need to install anything and everything that you use.

  7. #6
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    I have attempted to install Gentoo four times and each time a file stops reaching my computer meaning I have had to start again four times (using mobile broadband). So if you have any trouble getting a connection you may have trouble installing Gentoo.

    Good luck. The handbook is a good learning tool.

  8. #7
    Linux Engineer hazel's Avatar
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    I got Gentoo to install on the third attempt. The first two failed because I made mistakes, but I learned from them. It's not a particularly difficult process, and it has the great advantage that you can do it gradually over a few days, but it does require you to understand how Linux works.

    You do have to update frequently. I was told by more experienced people to do a daily update because weekly ones tend to be enormous. That's because Gentoo is really bleeding edge; they patch their programs a lot and update them constantly. And because it's source-based, updates take a long time, especially on an old machine.

    In the end it was the bleeding-edge thing that did for me. I couldn't cope with the stress of a daily update, knowing that there was a considerable risk of something getting broken each time. Now I use Crux, which is also source-based but much more stable.

    I suggest you read the Gentoo installation instructions. If you can understand what each step does, then you are ready to try it out.
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  9. #8
    Linux Guru Jonathan183's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by electroman6913 View Post
    I was thinking about trying out Gentoo.
    I've read that is uses port trees I was wondering how that would compare to how Arch is done.
    I currently use Arch on all my systems know. I love the configure ability of it. but the updates are kind of a pain because of the lag of my internet. I use satellite internet. I was wondering if trying out the port tree way would work better with my internet. I don't want to go back to other Linux distros I've used because I'll get bored.
    I use Arch and Gentoo, my expeirence is Arch is a bit more bleeding edge than Gentoo. I found Pacman always to be good with most updates working or quick fixes if they failed. Portage I found broke more frequently than Pacman ... but seems to have settled down a bit more for me now.

    Updates for Arch are quick because most are binary - except for AUR if you are using it.

    Updates for Gentoo take quite a bit longer than Arch because most things are compiled from source. You can build binary packages and use them for all your systems but you will still end up having to compile on one system.

    Pacman -w option allows download without install, emerge -f allows download without install also - so either way you should be able to do downloads when your net connection is working. Both allow sharing of downloaded content across multiple boxes.

    I have not had problems with net connection speeds or monitored closely downloads from each distro. If I had limited net then I'd probably run Debian stable and use the available bandwidth for things other than downloading the latest and greatest software

  10. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by meggin View Post
    I have attempted to install Gentoo four times and each time a file stops reaching my computer meaning I have had to start again four times (using mobile broadband). So if you have any trouble getting a connection you may have trouble installing Gentoo.

    Good luck. The handbook is a good learning tool.
    Thanks my problem is also with Internet connection mobile is my stable connection I use satellite internet and tether my cell phone when the satellite becomes unstable. From what every one is saying I'll think I'll have more problems with Gentoo than Arch. I've tried Linux Mint Debian Edition but I like Arch better Maybe i'ts just because I'm more used to it. And Arch seems to be better supported. I can always figure out how to do some thing on Arch right away while the Debian base one seam to take me a while to find documentation on what I want.

  11. #10
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    What would be awesome is if I could somehow get a package list from pacman and when I'm in town download them onto my laptop and then transfer them to my desktop when I get home.

    Or some how mirror the repositorys

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