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ok I've followed the handbook to the letter, base system is installed, time to do first reboot and install pakages/users, get to the login screen and type in root and ...
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  1. #1
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    Please help


    ok I've followed the handbook to the letter, base system is installed, time to do first reboot and install pakages/users, get to the login screen and type in root and the password that I have set 3 TIMES now and I still get incorrect login. this is getting frustrating

  2. #2
    Linux Guru sarumont's Avatar
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    Are you sure that you set the password inside the chrooted environment?
    "Time is an illusion. Lunchtime, doubly so."
    ~Douglas Adams, The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

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    yes i was inside the chrooted environment

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    Just Joined! bigjohn's Avatar
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    Not too sure how it's done (never had to do it, just read about it), but with problems like that, you'd normally have to start in "single" mode then you should be able to do the passwd command again.

    Ha, I've also just remembered what I did wrong. I don't know where you are, but I'm in the UK and I kept forgetting to set up the keyboard for UK, so I merrily went on doing the passwd thing, but when It came for my to try and put it in, it went to a sack of ****, because half of the non-letter keys where in the wrong bloody place.

    dunno if that's any help

    regards

    John

  5. #5
    Linux Guru sarumont's Avatar
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    It could be that your keymap is wrong, as bigjohn said.

    In the case that it's not, just boot to single user mode by putting the word 'single' at the end of your kernel line in grub. When grub loads, hit e to edit that entry, e to edit the second line (kernel /boot/.....) and put single at the end of it. Then hit enter and 'b' to boot. This should pop you into a console as root (without a password). From here, use the passwd command to change it to what you like and then reboot normally.
    "Time is an illusion. Lunchtime, doubly so."
    ~Douglas Adams, The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

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    Aren't you suppose to add the password outside the chrooted environment?

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    Thanks for the helo , I am in and emerging KDE right now, it failed once but it hs been going for 6 hours the second time around so hopefully I fixed the conflicts

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    Ha Ha! well done linux N0000b.

    Just a little bad news though. When I re-installed gentoo about 6 weeks ago (I think), I got the kde from the second disc, because of having previously had the misfortune of doing "emerge kde".

    Not that thats a bad thing, but on my system, "emerge kde" took 15 hours - and you'd have the same if like me, you want the option of having gnome as well (i.e. that'd be 15 hours or so for kde, plus another big chunk of compiling time for gnome). Plus it's gonna take nearly as long if you do "emerge openoffice".

    The even worse thing for me, was that I thought I was being clever, as I'd put my money where my mouth is and actually got "genuine" discs from the gentoo.org, unfortunately for me, between ordering the disc and them arriving, they changed the version from 2004.2 to 2004.3 and both kde and gnome released the latest versions, which meant that when I went to apply any updates and upgrades, it too a mere two and a half days to do "emerge --update --deep world".

    And if you (like me) then looked into something that might speed the compile times up a bit, you'll be lucky to find an affordable way, as it seems that the hardware vendors expect me to take out a mortgage for a multi processor system/additional identical system for networking so as to be able to exploit the distributed compiling facility!

    Oh well. I suppose it's just a case of being patient (something of which, I seem to have a distinct lack!).

    As I said, well done in getting it going. Good luck and I hope that you enjoy your gentoo system as it's not all bad news!.

    regards

    John

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    As soon as you get to know Gentoo you'll be in for a sweet ride. My brother is using Ubuntu and he's having trouble with all kinds of stuff, while I don't have any trouble at all with my Gentoo system. Only downside with Gentoo is having long compilings and the steep learning curve.

  10. #10
    Just Joined! bigjohn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by maol9883
    <snip> downside with Gentoo is having long compilings and the steep learning curve.
    You're not wrong!

    seasons greetings

    regards

    John

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