Find the answer to your Linux question:
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11
Um, isn't emerge the equivalent to install? Im confused about it because to emerge say firefox (as an example) on Gentoo takes hours compared to just installing it on windows. ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Linux Newbie
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    100

    Please explain emerge. Set me straight on this.


    Um, isn't emerge the equivalent to install? Im confused about it because to emerge say firefox (as an example) on Gentoo takes hours compared to just installing it on windows. Also, what is the difference between emerging .bin and regular files (like firefox). Also, why would I want to do .bin vs. regular or vice versa???

    What is the difference, and what exactly is it doing? Am I missing something.
    Ack!

  2. #2
    Linux Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Rockin' in the USA!!!
    Posts
    603
    emerge is part of the gentoo portage utility, it's the main tool used by gentoo users to install things. Now, because one of the main purposes of gentoo is to compile the whole or close to the whole system from scratch, that's what emerge does, it downloads, unpacks, compiles and installs the source code for the requested package. For some of the bigger packages though, the option is available to download the precompiled binaries (e.g. firefox, oofice) because these take a _long_ time to compile. It's up to the user, like me, the only binaries I have on my system are the sun jre, codecs, and realplayer (none are available as source code), whereas my friend who also runs gentoo, tends to install quite a few binaries to save time. Hope that answers all your questions

  3. #3
    Linux Newbie
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    100
    So binarys are faster?
    So what is different between that and what windows does to install something? (noobish question Yeah, I know. Bear with me) Which is faster (Linux or windows), assuming you are installing say for example firefox or opera? Why would one way of doing things be better than another?
    Ack!

  4. #4
    Linux Guru Vergil83's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    2,407
    Quote Originally Posted by Lotharjade
    So binarys are faster?
    So what is different between that and what windows does to install something? (noobish question Yeah, I know. Bear with me) Which is faster (Linux or windows), assuming you are installing say for example firefox or opera? Why would one way of doing things be better than another?
    Technically, binaries run slower because they are made do work for a large number of computers (new and old). However, when you use the source, you can tailor it for your own computer, and it could be faster. From the source, takes longer to install though. However, in my experience, the speed you gain is very small, assuming a decent system (however I am sure people will disagree with me on this ). In windows, you are also using binaries (different ones of course).
    Brilliant Mediocrity - Making Failure Look Good

  5. #5
    Linux Guru lakerdonald's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    St. Petersburg, FL
    Posts
    5,035
    Binaries are fine for the average joe desktop user who doesn't care about a few less crashes and a couple seconds less loading time. I personally like doing things from source, as I can build things the way that I'd like. Binaries also tend to be bloated, as most of the optional components are built-in. When compiling and installing from source, one can control what is built-in at compile time and what features to leave out.

  6. #6
    Linux Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Rockin' in the USA!!!
    Posts
    603
    One more thing that I think is important to point out here is that binaries, because of the fact that most of the options are enabled, usually have _many_ more dependencies, which is one of the reasons that prebuilt systems are so bloated and slow... plus compiling from source gives you an extra feeling of power

  7. #7
    Linux Newbie
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    100
    Hmmm, I guess I don't know how to compile like you are talking about...
    Ack!

  8. #8
    Linux Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Rockin' in the USA!!!
    Posts
    603
    emerge compiles everything for you, which is why it takes so long to install things, all you do is:
    Code:
    emerge <app-name>
    it downloads and compiles the program for you, but, like I said, you can download the precompiled versions of bigger apps which only take a couple of seconds rather than a couple of minutes to install, such as:
    Code:
    emerge mozilla-firefox-bin
    will download and install the precompiled version of firefox, whereas it would normally take about an hour to compile (on my system)

  9. #9
    Linux Newbie
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    112
    Emerge is the lazy (in terms of keystrokes) way of compiling stuff for Gentoo. As mentioned earlier, emerging something will download the source, compile it, and install it. Emerge also does some more fun stuff with your system! Emerge checks for dependencies of packages. For instance, application A requires compilers B and C. B and C reqyure languages or libraries D, E, and F. And library D cannot coexist with library X. By typing emerge A, your system would download, compile, and install A, B, C, D, E, and F after uninstalling X. Dependencies are Portage's way of making a stronger system. (Portage is the thing that manages emerges and applications.)

    Portage also manages betas, WIPs, and new programs. Portage makes you think twice about downloading a program with an unproven track record, or one currently in beta, by 'masking' it. I find this somewhat annoying, but whatever. It will warn you that the ebuild (what an emerge downloads) is masked (if it is), and will prevent you from easily obtaining it. You must manually edit certain files to unmask the program. It's like a child-proof bottle of pills.

    Comparing source to binaries is exactly like comparing saran wrap to zip-lock baggies. Some people like a tighter fit on their system, which is what source gives them. It's also like comparing tights with cargo pants. I prefer cargo pants in this case, but that's besides the point. Tights give you more manuverability, while cargo pants may be more comfy. It's up to the user.

    The last neat thing about source is that it's free. You can get the source, open it up and look at it, and code in your own stuff. Open source is what Linux is all about. It means 100% free applications that can be modified to your heart's content.

    Gentoo is the distro that is all about tights/saran wrap - that is, source. Because source makes patience pay off with much faster, lighter-weight applications that can be custom built to your specifications. Perhaps not everybody wants to use source, because source can be a challenge to become effective. But Gentoo also provides some binary support. So it's quite flexible in the end.
    --Dachnaz [Fuzzy Llama]

  10. #10
    Linux Engineer
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    1,431
    ortage makes you think twice about downloading a program with an unproven track record, or one currently in beta, by 'masking' it. I find this somewhat annoying, but whatever. It will warn you that the ebuild (what an emerge downloads) is masked (if it is), and will prevent you from easily obtaining it. You must manually edit certain files to unmask the program. It's like a child-proof bottle of pills.
    It's enough to type in this command to install the masked package:
    Code:
    ACCEPT_KEYWORDS="~x86" emerge <masked-package>

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •