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I am using Vidalinux. I did "emerge system --update". Everything went well, until the end. It said there were six files that needed to be updated in /etc. So, i ...
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  1. #1
    Linux Guru budman7's Avatar
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    etc update


    I am using Vidalinux. I did "emerge system --update".
    Everything went well, until the end. It said there were six files that needed to be updated in /etc.
    So, i did "find /etc -iname '._cfg????_*'"
    And I received these six files
    /etc/pam.d/._cfg0000_su
    /etc/conf.d/._cfg0000_net
    /etc/security/._cfg0000_pam_env.conf
    /etc/._cfg0000_make.conf.example
    /etc/._cfg0000_fstab
    /etc/modules.autoload.d/._cfg0000_kernel-2.6

    My question is how do I update these files?
    Is it as simple as "cp /etc/ pam.d/._cfg0000_su /etc/pam.d"?
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  2. #2
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    This handles everything for you:
    Code:
    etc-update

  3. #3
    Linux Guru budman7's Avatar
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    Thanks jaboua, I had tried almost every combination of etc update.
    The one I didn't think to try was etc-update.
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  5. #4
    Linux Guru sdousley's Avatar
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    if u are ever not too sure about a command, but have a reasonable idea of what it could be, just do:

    Code:
    <first couple of letters of command><tab><tab>
    eg with this, just type:
    Code:
    etc<tab><tab>
    will return possible commands:
    etc-update
    etcat
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  6. #5
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    I could be wrong but i think you need to "emerge tab-completion" first.

    I'm on WinXP Laptop at the moment so i cant check.

  7. #6
    Linux Guru sdousley's Avatar
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    if you do, then my computer must of done it automatically It just works here
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  8. #7
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    Perhaps you have "tab-completion" as a USE flag in your make.conf?

    Or perhaps you have installed a virtual console which has its own tab-completion flag?

    Unless the 2005 Gentoo install has a newer bash with tab-completion built in?

    Who knows? Todays mystery in the twilight zone.

    .........................

  9. #8
    Linux Guru sdousley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alunt2003
    Perhaps you have "tab-completion" as a USE flag in your make.conf?

    Or perhaps you have installed a virtual console which has its own tab-completion flag?
    I dont have a tab-completion USE flag.

    As far as i know (apart from aterm/xterm) I haven't installed any consoles. It works in my VT 1 thru 6 aswell tho.

    And i installed off the 2004.3 disk, not the 2005.0
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  10. #9
    Linux Guru sarumont's Avatar
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    tab-completion is a function of BASH, not something you install. There are things that you can emerge to make bash's completion better or add some gentoo-specific things, but basic tab-completion is a function of BASH.

    Also, I'd highly suggest using dispatch-conf over etc-update. dispatch-conf uses rcs to keep a backup of all your old configs. It also gives you more options when you run it as to what to do with the files. Having these backups definately help if you ever accidently overwrite a custom config with a default.
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  11. #10
    Linux Guru sdousley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sarumont
    Also, I'd highly suggest using dispatch-conf over etc-update. dispatch-conf uses rcs to keep a backup of all your old configs. It also gives you more options when you run it as to what to do with the files. Having these backups definately help if you ever accidently overwrite a custom config with a default.
    Noted.

    as of yet, i haven't really edited many config files (apart from xorg.conf, which i have backed up already) But good thing to know
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