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okay so im still really new to linux, but for the past few years ive been studying linux, ive always viewed gentoo as one of the best distros. im wondering ...
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  1. #1
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    moving to gentoo


    okay so im still really new to linux, but for the past few years ive been studying linux, ive always viewed gentoo as one of the best distros. im wondering how much do i need to know to know my way around this distribution. ive been using mandriva so im not exactly experienced in linux at all yet.

  2. #2
    Linux Guru dylunio's Avatar
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    I'll say that gentoo is great for learning in its self

    I went SuSE (for *ages*) -> Yoper (v.short time) -> Ubuntu (v.short time) -> Slack (long time [over two months]) and then onto Gentoo.

    As long as you follow the handbook, the install is not too hard, and there are plenty of guids on how to set things up on gentoos site heh i skipped that stuff in the middle went strait form suse after 4 months to gentoo and from then on realy learned linux fast...
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    Linux Guru Cabhan's Avatar
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    I found the install pretty easy, so long as you follow the Handbook EXACTLY.

    That said, the distro itself I find to be a very easy one to use. Installation of new packages and maintaining the environment is very easy:

    Code:
    emerge <APP_NAME>   <-- To install APP_NAME
    emerge -NuD world    <-- To update every installed package
    Also, Gentoo is EXTREMELY customizable. You only need to install what you want, and you have free and unlimited access to config files and such things. This is great when combined with the KDE 3.4 split ebuilds, allowing you to only install what apps you want (which is great for, say media, since KDE has like 47 audio apps).

    Basically, I find it a very easy and efficient distro to use. Some people claim the install is really hard, I didn't find that the case. That said, it can be LONG, but it is not hard.


    For the record, it took me about 4 days to install Gentoo, install KDE 3.3 (before split ebuilds) and OpenOffice.org. So leave yourself some time. I also highly recommend doing the install through Knoppix so that you have a GUI, Internet, IM, and other stuff:

    http://www.gentoo.org/doc/en/altinstall.xml#doc_chap3

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    okay, well im waiting untill i get my new hard drive to install gentoo, because i have 2 40's right now in ntfs one has my music and the other has all of my emulators and roms (im a joystick junkie, im considering slapping linux on my mame machine as well) and i want to be able to slap it all in one drive.
    the main thing that im wondering about is the whole stage # tarbell jazz. i mean its a seperate file all together, how exactly does this work???

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    OK, you download a stage-tarball and extract it. Stage1 is almost like a zip-file containing the parts of your system which you can't live without, and the you then recompile these parts to your preference and then go on other importent parts of the system. With stage2, these parts are allready ready compiled for you, and you can consentrate on installing the rest of the basic system-packages which is needed to complete your gentoo. With stage3 this is done for you too, and you only need to install a bootloader, system-logger etc and the apps you want to have available (like X, kde/gnome/xfce7fluxbox/E, firefox etc etc). Stage1 gives the most control, while stage3 is fastest + is easier (not because stage1 is hard, but because you have to read more + type more commands). If you look at the gentoo handbook, they have a nice intro to chosing stages too.

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    Gentoo Greatness

    Here are some fun alternate gentoo installation instructions from the wikipedia. Maybe you would be interested.

    http://gentoo-wiki.com/HOWTO_Ultimate_Gentoo_Box

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    so theres no real gui installer for gentoo, so do you have to download the tarbell during installation or have it on a seperate cd. stage 1 would have kde or gnome or anything, it would just be straight commandline. where would i get it then, through the portage system???
    uchihasasuke, as for the livecd on that guide, are the talking about gentoo's live cd or just a live cd in general (ex. knoppix, slax, DSL)

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    yes it would be straight command line...any live cd will do; however, mounting /proc is a little different between the gentoo live cd and another one...

    for kde

    emerge kde

    for gnome

    emerge gnome

    once you get gentoo setup you will like its package management system.
    Operating System: GNU Emacs

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    If, like me you are new to linux, I would go for the stage 3 install ( I did ) wasn't too difficult and left me with a nice feeling of acclompishment.

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