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I am ordering a Gentoo CD and i currently have Suse 9.3, i was wondering what is the easiest way to do a dual boot with these?...
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  1. #1
    Linux Enthusiast crashandburn0420's Avatar
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    Dual boot Suse and Gentoo


    I am ordering a Gentoo CD and i currently have Suse 9.3, i was wondering what is the easiest way to do a dual boot with these?

  2. #2
    Linux User St. Joe's Avatar
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    This is not difficult. When you install Gentoo just be sure to place the bootloader in the root '/' partition (or /boot if you made a separate partition for that path). Do not install it to the MBR which would be, depending on the command you use, either /dev/hdx or (hd0,0). Then you only need to copy over the default kernel line from ~/grub/menu.lst to the same file in your Suse installation.
    It may be that your sole purpose in life is simply to serve as a warning to others.

  3. #3
    Linux Enthusiast crashandburn0420's Avatar
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    i kind of get what you are saying but just to make sure so i don't mess it up can you say that again a little simplier

  4. #4
    Linux User St. Joe's Avatar
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    You only need a single bootloader to multi-boot however many OS's you place on your hard drive. There is already one provided with your Suse install so there's no reason to change that setup. You can use it going forward. When you install Gentoo you'll want to avoid placing it's bootloader (grub) to the MBR because that will write over the Suse boot config. So, you will want to place it in its own root (or boot) partition. All of this can be changed at a later date so don't think worry about it being a permanent decision.

    The only thing you want to make sure of is that you can still boot into your system after you install Gentoo. This will not be a problem if you just continue to use Suse's bootloader. Gentoo's bootoader will also work fine, but again what you have already works so let's just keep what isn't broke.

    Finally, you need to copy over Gentoo's default kernel line in its /boot/grub/menu.lst to the identically named file in Suse. If you are not accustomed to editing this file then the best thing would be to simply post its contents after installation and we can tell you what should be copied over to Suse. That will allow you to select Gentoo the next time you boot and are presented with Grub's boot option menu.
    It may be that your sole purpose in life is simply to serve as a warning to others.

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