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i ran vidalinux before actually giving gentoo a shot (vidalinux was really easy to install and is gentoo-based). the version of vidalinux used gentoo 2004.X and i had to go ...
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  1. #1
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    simple question regarding gentoo version


    i ran vidalinux before actually giving gentoo a shot (vidalinux was really easy to install and is gentoo-based). the version of vidalinux used gentoo 2004.X and i had to go through a few steps to get it to know what the new portage tree was....2005.0 (i think that's what i did). now there's a new version of gentoo...2005.1. do i have to do anything or is it taken care of automatically? do i only have to do this when there's a full version change...ie. 200X?

    sorry for the simple question, i'm just somewhat curious and want to make sure everything's how it should be . thanks in advance!

  2. #2
    Linux Guru Cabhan's Avatar
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    I'm not entirely sure what you're asking...

    Running
    Code:
    emerge --sync
    will sync you to the current Portage tree. All updates are handled automatically; when it went from 2005.0 (what I installed at) to 2005.1, I didn't have to do anything.

    Portage can also update itself through
    Code:
    emerge -NuD world
    so you don't need to worry about that either.

    I'm not entirely sure what your question is, so if that didn't answer it, can you explain again?

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cabhan
    I'm not entirely sure what you're asking...

    Running
    Code:
    emerge --sync
    will sync you to the current Portage tree. All updates are handled automatically; when it went from 2005.0 (what I installed at) to 2005.1, I didn't have to do anything.

    Portage can also update itself through
    Code:
    emerge -NuD world
    so you don't need to worry about that either.

    I'm not entirely sure what your question is, so if that didn't answer it, can you explain again?
    that might have answered the question

    i just remembered running a few steps to get my profile updated from 2004.X to 2005.0 before...maybe it really wasn't a big deal (but seemed like it since i was new??). i did some searching and it seems that "source /etc/profile" may update the profile also . maybe that's what i was thinking of by "a few more steps" lol.

    so, lets say there's a new profile, "2006.0" that would come out. would i have to do anything special to update from 2005.1 to 2006.0? i'm almost sure i did something extra (might have just been "env-update && source /etc/profile") when i changed from 2004.X to 2005.0.

    oh well...if it's as easy as running "emerge --sync && emerge -uDN world" than that's great!


    also, how would i check which profile i'm using? 2005.0, 2005.1,...?

  4. #4
    Linux User St. Joe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by josolanes
    so, lets say there's a new profile, "2006.0" that would come out. would i have to do anything special to update from 2005.1 to 2006.0?
    Read this doc: Profile Updating Instructions.
    There's always a doc.
    It may be that your sole purpose in life is simply to serve as a warning to others.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by St. Joe
    Quote Originally Posted by josolanes
    so, lets say there's a new profile, "2006.0" that would come out. would i have to do anything special to update from 2005.1 to 2006.0?
    Read this doc: Profile Updating Instructions.
    There's always a doc.
    that's exactly what i was talking about when i said i needed to follow some steps to move from 2004.X to 2005.0 . thanks a lot!

    that link also shows how to move from profile to profile

    i didn't see it in the link, but how would i check to see what profile i'm currently using? sorry if it was in the link...i briefly scanned through it to see something about finding your current profile but didn't notice it

  6. #6
    Linux User St. Joe's Avatar
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    If it exists, what does your /etc/make.profile symlink point to?
    That is your current profile.

    If it doesn't exist then you can make one.
    For example on an amd64 arch with 2005.0 profile:

    Code:
    # ln -s /usr/portage/profiles/default-linux/amd64/2005.0 /etc/make.profile
    It may be that your sole purpose in life is simply to serve as a warning to others.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by St. Joe
    If it exists, what does your /etc/make.profile symlink point to?
    That is your current profile.

    If it doesn't exist then you can make one.
    For example on an amd64 arch with 2005.0 profile:

    Code:
    # ln -s /usr/portage/profiles/default-linux/amd64/2005.0 /etc/make.profile
    thanks a lot for the info

    to check where the symlink points to...would i just do "ls" then the symlink?

    if i do that, it shows what's in the directory that it points to, but it's hard to guess where it actually points to. i was hoping for more of a "2005.1" type of display when i check it. i'm sure i did it wrong lol, that's why it doesn't give me the info i'm really looking for

  8. #8
    Linux Guru Cabhan's Avatar
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    Code:
     ls -ld /etc/make.profile
    -l -- Long display (to show what the link points to)
    -d -- Show the directory, not its contents

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cabhan
    Code:
     ls -ld /etc/make.profile
    -l -- Long display (to show what the link points to)
    -d -- Show the directory, not its contents
    yep, that worked

    i've never seen that added parts to "ls". i should have read through the manual some....i thought it would have been a completely different command to look for the directory it's linked to

    thanks a lot!

  10. #10
    Linux Guru Cabhan's Avatar
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    :P.

    A few useful ones, then:

    Code:
    ls -a     <-- Display all Files &#40;even hidden ones&#41;
    ls -l     <-- Long display &#40;file sizes, permissions, owner, etc.&#41;
    ls -lh    <-- Long display with file sizes in terms of KB, MB, and GB
    ls -d     <-- Show directory, not contents
    Anyway, glad we helped! And hell, I didn't even know about that profile thing: I'm now usin 2005.1 instead of 2005.0 .

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