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on my first attempt to install gentoo and compile a kernel from scratch, i think i messed it up. it compiles and install okay, but when i come to booting ...
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  1. #1
    Linux Engineer d38dm8nw81k1ng's Avatar
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    the usual kernel panic troubles - SOLVED


    on my first attempt to install gentoo and compile a kernel from scratch, i think i messed it up. it compiles and install okay, but when i come to booting the OS from the hard drive i suffer a kernel panic:
    Code:
    usb 4-1: new low speed USB device using uhci_hcd and address 2
    UDF-fs: No partition found(1)
    Kernel panic - Not syncing:VFS: Unable to mount root fs on unkown-block(3,3)
    i installed it on a reiserfs partition and have already configured ReiserFS support into the Kernel. the GRUB Boot is also pointing to the correct Kernel (kernel-2.6.12-gentoo-r6). i am running an IDE hard drive and have installed the support for that as well. although, i am looking at the config file now and am wondering if Parallel IDE high-level drivers will be of any importance.

    the only part of the manual i didn't follow is the networking section (since i ain't setting up a network and only have access to the internet from a USB modem ) i also didn't change the symlink to kernel-2.6.11-gentoo-r3 but i can't see this making much difference.


    EDIT: I (sortof) solved this problem when i got my new ethernet modem and was able to start from stage 1
    Here's why Linux is easier than Windows:
    Package Managers! Apt-Get and Portage (among others) allow users to install programs MUCH easier than Windows can.
    Hardware Drivers. In SuSE, ALL the hardware is detected and installed automatically! How is this harder than Windows' constant disc changing and rebooting?

  2. #2
    Linux Guru dylunio's Avatar
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    can you post your grub.conf file as well as say which partitions (/dev/hd**) the /boot and / partitions are on.
    Registered Linux User #371543!
    Get force-get May The Source Be With You
    /dev/null
    /dev/null2

  3. #3
    Linux Engineer d38dm8nw81k1ng's Avatar
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    well, the SuSE GRUB (which i'm using) calls it menu.lst but here it is:

    Code:
    title =Gentoo Linux 2005.1
    root (hd0,0)
    kernel /kernel-2.6.12-gentoo-r6 root=/dev/hda3
    the GRUB is on my /dev/hda6 (SUSE) iirc. there is a GRUB installed on /dev/hda1 but that wasn't booting SUSE so i reverted to the SuSE one.
    the /boot and / for gentoo are on /dev/hda3
    Here's why Linux is easier than Windows:
    Package Managers! Apt-Get and Portage (among others) allow users to install programs MUCH easier than Windows can.
    Hardware Drivers. In SuSE, ALL the hardware is detected and installed automatically! How is this harder than Windows' constant disc changing and rebooting?

  4. #4
    Linux Guru dylunio's Avatar
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    hmm, try this as the gentoo stanza for the menu.lst:
    title GENTOO
    kernel (hd0,2)/kernel-2.6.12-gentoo-r6 root=/dev/hda3
    Registered Linux User #371543!
    Get force-get May The Source Be With You
    /dev/null
    /dev/null2

  5. #5
    Linux Engineer d38dm8nw81k1ng's Avatar
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    ok, that didn't work. it gave me a file not found error, which means the problem isn't GRUB, but it is the gentoo kernel.
    Here's why Linux is easier than Windows:
    Package Managers! Apt-Get and Portage (among others) allow users to install programs MUCH easier than Windows can.
    Hardware Drivers. In SuSE, ALL the hardware is detected and installed automatically! How is this harder than Windows' constant disc changing and rebooting?

  6. #6
    Linux Guru dylunio's Avatar
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    Can you post the whole of your gentoo fstab file then please.
    Registered Linux User #371543!
    Get force-get May The Source Be With You
    /dev/null
    /dev/null2

  7. #7
    Linux Engineer d38dm8nw81k1ng's Avatar
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    ok, i entered it as it was in the manual but when i did a SuSE repair (for other reasons) it decided that it was wrong, and this is the outcome:
    Code:
    shm           /dev/shm      tmpfs       nodev,nosuid,noexec 0 0
    /dev/hda3  /                   reiserfs       noatime                 1 1
    /dev/hdc    /mnt/cdrom   subfs          noauto, (blah)         0 0
    devpts       /dev/pts        devpts        mode=620,gid=5     0 0
    usbfs         /proc/bus/usb usbfs           noauto                  0 0
    /dev/hda1  /boot             ext2            noauto,user           0 0
    worth noting that i don't boot from hda1, i boot from hda6 (SuSE).
    Here's why Linux is easier than Windows:
    Package Managers! Apt-Get and Portage (among others) allow users to install programs MUCH easier than Windows can.
    Hardware Drivers. In SuSE, ALL the hardware is detected and installed automatically! How is this harder than Windows' constant disc changing and rebooting?

  8. #8
    Linux Guru dylunio's Avatar
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    Hmm, the only thing I can suggest is to try to get it to boot with:
    shm /dev/shm tmpfs nodev,nosuid,noexec 0 0
    /dev/hda3 / reiserfs noatime 1 1
    /dev/hdc /mnt/cdrom subfs noauto, (blah) 0 0
    devpts /dev/pts devpts mode=620,gid=5 0 0
    #usbfs /proc/bus/usb usbfs noauto 0 0
    /dev/hda1 /boot ext2 noauto,user 0 0
    Registered Linux User #371543!
    Get force-get May The Source Be With You
    /dev/null
    /dev/null2

  9. #9
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    Try this: Get the Grub command prompt by pressing 'c' when you get the boot menu. At the Grub prompt, do 'root (hd0,0)' and then do 'kernel / <tab>'. Grub should return a list of files found in (hd0,0) and you should see in that list your kernel 'kernel-2.6.12-gentoo-r6'. If it isn't listed, we need to look elsewhere.
    /IMHO
    //got nothin'
    ///this use to look better

  10. #10
    Linux Guru
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    dylunio, could the reiserfs be causing a problem? How does Grub know to use the stage1.5-reiserfs and not another one?
    /IMHO
    //got nothin'
    ///this use to look better

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