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OK, thanks for the explaination anomie :P Originally Posted by smolloy Originally Posted by Wikipedia.org Sysfs is a virtual file system provided by the 2.6 Linux kernel. Sysfs exports information ...
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  1. #11
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    OK, thanks for the explaination anomie :P

    Quote Originally Posted by smolloy
    Quote Originally Posted by Wikipedia.org
    Sysfs is a virtual file system provided by the 2.6 Linux kernel. Sysfs exports information about devices and drivers from the kernel device model to userspace, and is also used for configuration.
    I wonder if that means that it's safe to erase since the kernel will regenerate it on boot??
    I think so, but way do you want to erase it, it's there for a reason, besides if the kernel automaticly regenerates it, why delete it?

  2. #12
    Linux Guru smolloy's Avatar
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    Sorry, I didn't explain that.

    I recently updated gcc to 3.4 from 3.3, and after the update I get a lot of error messages on boot that are something like,
    Code:
    rm: Cannot remove /sys/... : Operation not permitted
    (That's from memory)

    It repeats this many times for (I think) every file and folder in /sys, so I thought that the kernel attempts to remove and recreate /sys everytime the computer boots, but for some reason was having trouble. If this is the case, then removing it using a liveCD might solve this.

    I think I might just temporarily rename the folder and create an empty /sys, just to see what happens. If it kills it, then it would be easy enough to switch back to the backup version.

    What do you think?? Am I being smart?? Or am I heading for a world of hurt??
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  3. #13
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    Nope, cause it's easier and works better like this:
    Code:
    umount /sys

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  5. #14
    Linux Guru smolloy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jaboua
    Nope, cause it's easier and works better like this:
    Code:
    umount /sys
    I don't understand. If I umount it, won't it just remount as usual when I reboot?? The boot errors I'm getting would still appear, wouldn't they??
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  6. #15
    Linux Guru loft306's Avatar
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    [quote="smolloy"]
    Code:
    rm: Cannot remove /sys/... : Operation not permitted
    (That's from memory)
    hmmm this is famillar to me but as i remember it is just an error and dosnt realy break anything
    look in your logs to try to find what is calling for this to be done


    also i checked my old box and this my newest and they booth have /sys
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  7. #16
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    Sorry

    Sorry to bring back a topic that old, but I couldn't find any documentation about the /sys folder online.

    Is there a clean way to prevent it from being mounted at startup?
    Any place I can find more documentation you guys know of?

    Thanks a lot!

    - trib'

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