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  1. #11
    Linux Engineer psic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by www.gentoo.org
    A stage3 tarball is an archive containing a minimal Gentoo environment, suitable to continue the Gentoo installation using the instructions in this manual. Previously, the Gentoo Handbook described the installation using one of three stage tarballs. While Gentoo still offers stage1 and stage2 tarballs, the official installation method uses the stage3 tarball.
    Just follow the manual, it will lead you through the stage3 install. In the instructions, there's also a link on doing a stage 1 or 2 install, though you don't have to bother with that.

  2. #12
    Linux Engineer d38dm8nw81k1ng's Avatar
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    unless you're a developer a stage 1 or stage 2 are a waste of time.
    Here's why Linux is easier than Windows:
    Package Managers! Apt-Get and Portage (among others) allow users to install programs MUCH easier than Windows can.
    Hardware Drivers. In SuSE, ALL the hardware is detected and installed automatically! How is this harder than Windows' constant disc changing and rebooting?

  3. #13
    So if the minimal install only has stage 1 and stage 2 tarballs, where can i get an iso that has a stage3 tarball?

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  5. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by GivePeaceAChance
    So if the minimal install only has stage 1 and stage 2 tarballs, where can i get an iso that has a stage3 tarball?
    Go to gentoo mirrors.
    http://www.gentoo.org/main/en/mirrors.xml
    and get the newest version(2006.1) under releases.
    And get the stage 3 tarball under stages.

    Jag

  6. #15
    So what I'm downloading is a .tar.bz2 file. Does this mean I have to unpack and compile it using Knoppix? Where do I go from here once the file finishes downloading and using up precious, finite university bandwidth?

  7. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by www.gentoo.org
    3. Knoppix Installation

    Note: Knoppix is only available for x86 users.

    Booting from the Knoppix LiveCD is a way to have a fully functional system while you're compiling Gentoo. Tux Racer will help you pass the time while you wait, and you can use OpenOffice for work.

    Warning: Be aware that if you save anything in Knoppix's home directory while waiting for your Gentoo system to install, it will not be available when you reboot into Gentoo. Be sure to save important files on the hard disk or on some other computer!

    Boot from the Knoppix CD. If you have Knoppix 3.6-3.8.2, you will need to specify knoppix26 as a boot option to load a 2.6 kernel. If you miss this step, when you chroot, you will recieve an error saying that your kernel is too old. If, however, you have Knoppix 3.9+, this step is unnecessary, since the 2.6 kernel is default.

    By default Knoppix boots into a KDE desktop. Open a konsole and su - so you can change your password. This lets you set the root password for Knoppix. You can now configure sshd for remote login, at your preference.

    Code Listing 3.1: Creating the /mnt/gentoo mountpoint

    # mkdir /mnt/gentoo

    At this point, you can pick up with the standard install documentation at part 4. However, when you are asked to mount the proc system, issue the following command instead:
    yep you have to download and compile it. Then use the normal procedure as shown above

  8. #17
    Uh oh. I have a slight problem. The internet I'm using is at a university, and when I signed up for it with Windows, I opened up Firefox, went to unbc.ca, and registered my student ID and a password and I was good. With the Knoppix CD, it's not allowing me any internet access. Do you know why this is and/or how I can fix this?

  9. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by GivePeaceAChance
    Uh oh. I have a slight problem. The internet I'm using is at a university, and when I signed up for it with Windows, I opened up Firefox, went to unbc.ca, and registered my student ID and a password and I was good. With the Knoppix CD, it's not allowing me any internet access. Do you know why this is and/or how I can fix this?
    May be a firewall/proxy settings problem.
    Contact your network administrator.

    Jag

  10. #19
    So apparently I may have to tell Knoppix that I'm running on a DHCP client. So where in Knoppix do I do that? I'm working on a project for someone at the moment, but when I am free I'll boot knoppix myself to see if I can find anything, if someone doesn't reply to this message before then.

  11. #20
    Linux Guru Cabhan's Avatar
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    I'm trying to remember exactly what the option is (I don't have my Knoppix CD with me), but I believe it's under the Knoppix Menu, under Networking. I believe the option is "Configure Internet" or "Configure Network" or something like that. It will ask you if you wish to enable DHCP.

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