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Originally Posted by GivePeaceAChance Why wouldn't an NTFS partition be better than FAT32? Because linux won't be able to write to it. Originally Posted by GivePeaceAChance Does this mean that ...
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  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by GivePeaceAChance
    Why wouldn't an NTFS partition be better than FAT32?
    Because linux won't be able to write to it.

    Quote Originally Posted by GivePeaceAChance
    Does this mean that I can't use FAT32 if my hard drive (or partition) is more than 32 GB, cause it will be at least 40 GB...
    The site says:
    Quote Originally Posted by Wikipedia
    Windows 2000 and Windows XP can read and write to FAT32 filesystems of any size, but the format program on these platforms can only create FAT32 filesystems up to 32 GB.
    So you can create larger FAT32 partitions, but not with the format program which comes with Win2000 and XP. In theory, though, you could just create two 20 gig partitions. Gparted or something similar should by all rights be able to make a FAT32 partition. Not sure what went wrong before, one idea is that Windows will want to re-format this partition once it has been made?

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    So I should make a FAT32 partition that's about 40 GB for my data using "gparted"?

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by GivePeaceAChance
    So I should make a FAT32 partition that's about 40 GB for my data using "gparted"?
    Yes. You can use the livecd.

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    Well I downloaded and ran the liveCD, but it gave me an error after a few options.

    I booted the CD
    Skipped optional boot options
    Chose my language
    Chose my screen depth (whatever that is) @ 24
    Chose my keyboard
    Chose my resolution (I just picked one, since my 1440x900 wasn't listed)

    Then it gave me an error.

    Why? Also, must I use the CD? Could I save myself the trouble by simply using gparted in Ubuntu?

  6. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by GivePeaceAChance
    Could I save myself the trouble by simply using gparted in Ubuntu?
    Oh, sorry, didn't notice you had Ubuntu installed By all means, use the Gparted in Ubuntu.

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    Aight, I'll try that. So I'll just use gparted to make a 40+ GB partition labelled as FAT32 then?

    EDIT: OK, I made a FAT32 partition on my second hard drive (Windows is on the first, Linux is on the second) and rebooted into Ubuntu again. For some reason, the FAT32 drive, while still a part of my partition table when I look at gparted, does not appear to be anywhere. I can't access it through Linux, and most likely not through Windows.

    EDIT 2: Ack. I was playing around with the partitions and noticed that the reason it's not recognized, at least in Linux, if not Windows, is because it's not mounted. So how do I mount it? I've tried looking around, but it may involve editing my fstab, which I'm not sure what to edit in fstab.

  8. #37
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    Yup, you'll have to add a line like the following one to /etc/fstab (as root):

    /dev/hda5 /mnt/hda5 vfat auto,users,exec,umask=000 0 0

    Note that in 'hda5', the 'a' is the first harddrive, the 5 is the fifth partition. So if you have this on the second harddrive and the ninth partition, make it /dev/hdb9. The /mnt/hda5 can be whatever, this is where you are going to be mounting it. You have to create a folder called hda5 in /mnt (or you can set it to /mnt/files and make a folder called files).

    Hope all of that is clear.

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    Yup, I got it working and have done a few tests, and still doing a few tests, to see what I get when editing and saving files on either OS. So far so good.

    But a question: Why use FAT32 when I can use a more modern FS like NTFS? What are the advantages to either?

  10. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by GivePeaceAChance
    But a question: Why use FAT32 when I can use a more modern FS like NTFS?
    As I've already said, Linux can't write to NTFS, not by default anyway. There are ways (captive ntfs), but that's very risky, and can ruin the ntfs drive. Here's a comparison of file sistems. For actual benchmarks, do a google search.

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    OK, I checked it out, but again, although I understood some of it, I didn't know a bunch of the terminology like Block-journalling etc. So in your opinion, for sharing data between Gentoo, Windows, and Ubuntu, is FAT32 sufficient enough for that, in terms of file-name length, size, directory size (i.e. /somefolder/somefolder2/somefolder3/exceptionallylongfilename) etc? I don't believe I have any files over four gigs in size alone, so in that respect I should be safe.

    EDIT: Additionally, now that this is pretty much covered, what would you suggest to be my "partitioning scheme" for Gentoo? I've got all my raw data on the FAT32, so I'm just now unsure of how the Gentoo OS should be set up. Chapter 4 in the handbook is a bit overwhelming, so I need an expert opinion as to how I should partition my harddrive.

    http://www.gentoo.org/doc/en/handboo...?part=1&chap=4

    EDIT: also, is it possible to have a bit of a tree kind of thing? Like have a partition called Gentoo, then have extended partitions that comprise of the Gentoo system inside of the Gentoo partition itself?

    Gentoo partition
    -> extended partition /home
    ->extended partition /boot
    ->etc.

    Or perhaps I don't quite understand what an extended partition is...

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