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In a word, yes, Fat32. Comments on your edit: You can only have 4 primary partitions due to size limitations of the master boot record. You can get around this ...
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  1. #41
    Linux Engineer psic's Avatar
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    In a word, yes, Fat32.


    Comments on your edit:
    You can only have 4 primary partitions due to size limitations of the master boot record. You can get around this by using an extended partition (which the MBR thinks is a primary partition), which itself houses logical partitions. My advice would be to keep it simple and make a single partition, about 8 to 10 gigs. It will have your /home folder, but seeing as you'll be putting most of your files on the Fat32 partition, this will probably not be used all that much. Why 8 to 10 gigs? Because compling lots of large stuff (openoffice, xwindows, gnome, etc.) can sometimes take up quite a bit of space. Better safe than sorry. I'm guessing you are using Lilo or Grub from your Ubuntu install? This means you don't have to install a boot loader for gentoo, but just add an entry for gentoo in Ubuntu's Lilo (grub) configuration. This means you don't need a separate /boot partition. We've already said you won't be using /home much, so there's not much of a reason to put that on a separate partition, either.

    Again, I hope all of that was clear. I'm kind of surprised by how much homework you're doing with this, I'm the type of person that jumps in head first and asks questions later

  2. #42
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    I take it you mean about FAT32. Check my edits in the previous post of mine. I added some edits, and perhaps you didn't get them all. Sorry for the confusion.

  3. #43
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    Well normally I just jump right in (with respect to coding and installing stuff on windows) but I want to get this right the first time, and make it the best setup I can make it right off the bat so I don't have to mess with it much later.

    So when partitioned for Linux previously, I would create a root / partition and a swap partition.

    Are you suggesting I simply create a /home partition (I assume it's primary, not extended or logical or anything like that) and forego the / partition, and just let Gentoo share the swap space I have set up for Ubuntu. Is this what you're saying?

    EDIT: I'm just checking the Handbook again, and it has some things I'm not sure about.

    It asks me to remove all my partitions (at least on this drive. I'm assuming I could take the liberty to NOT delete my FAT32 partition, but can I just go ahead and NOT delete any partitions and simply continue with the partitioning?
    It talks about creating a boot partition. Do I need to create this, or do I just make a /home partition like you said?
    It says to create a swap partition. I'm guessing I can simply keep the swap partition I have and that can be my Gentoo (as well as Ubuntu) swap partition.
    It tells me to create a root partition.

    So which of these suggested partitions do I actually need? Can you tell me exactly which partitions I need to create, and whether they should be primary, extended, or logical?

    Finally, it talks about making filesystems. Since I already have FAT32, must I bother with making a filesystem?

  4. #44
    Linux Guru Juan Pablo's Avatar
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    I don't want to bother you or offend you in anyway but you should learn a bit more before installing Gentoo, compiling the kernel, setting flags, may be a bit too hard if you are not very familiar with Linux.

    Better focus on learning the basics (like what is a tarball, partition theory, etc) before going to harder things like Gentoo. Try using Slackware as preparation course.

    Once you have learned all that you will be welcome and all us can help you with more specific issues. And surely you will be rewarded with a fast system and no problems at all during installation

    Just my 2 cents
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  5. #45
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    Your post is exactly why I found psic's "I'm kind of surprised by how much homework you're doing with this, I'm the type of person that jumps in head first and asks questions later" comment funny, because in truth, I normally jump right into things, but here, I'm actually taking my time, making sure I get what I'm doing. So in a way, I'm researching, but with respect to Linux in general, I'm jumping right into the deep end and learning as I go, coupled with the very limited knowlege I had before doing all this.

    So as much as you want to tell me to take it step by step, I'm not interested. Seriously. It will be a hard confusing road, but I've already learned way much more with this forum and Gentoo process than I knew before. I like jumping in. I didn't much like SuSE or all those others because they were too windows-based. I want to learn commandline commands and stuff. I don't want to bother with the ease-of-use stuff. I'd rather the hard way, at least right now. Read my first post, where I told people in this thread that I don't want to be dissuaded. :P (Note, my post seems to come off a bit harsh, but basically I'm just trying to say I want help with this process, not dissuasion. If anyone can help, I would like that, because I'll need it, I just don't want to stick with a system like Ubuntu or SuSE where it has a lot of window "let us do it for you" stuff. I like my choices, and I like to know exactly what's on my system, hence the Gentoo path.)

  6. #46
    Linux Guru Juan Pablo's Avatar
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    Very good if you want to go this way.
    I wish you a lot of luck with the gentoo installation and i'm sure you will get it working nicely without too much problems and I'll try to help in the things you may need (I'm not a linux guru and nothing close but i know a thing or two)

    Be aware that may be a steep learning curve ....

    A lot of luck for you
    Put your hand in an oven for a minute and it will be like an hour, sit beside a beautiful woman for an hour and it will be like a minute, that is relativity. --Albert Einstein
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  7. #47
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    Oh yes, I know there will be a steep learning curve. I've heard Gentoo is one of the toughest, if not the toughest linux systems to get going and perhaps learn to use. So that, coupled with my inexperience with linux itself, should make for quite a big learning curve. Heck, I've been at this for at least a week already and I haven't even started installing Gentoo itself (said to take about four hours alone)

    But that, to me, is half the fun.

    Especially, when I think, at then end of the day I'll have only what I put on the system and have complete control over my system. Then the customization phase begins, and that itself will be no easy task. But it'll be worth it. I'm looking forward to it.

  8. #48
    Linux Engineer psic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GivePeaceAChance
    So when partitioned for Linux previously, I would create a root / partition and a swap partition.

    Are you suggesting I simply create a /home partition (I assume it's primary, not extended or logical or anything like that) and forego the / partition, and just let Gentoo share the swap space I have set up for Ubuntu. Is this what you're saying?
    No! Sorry, I just re-read my post and it's not clear enough. You HAVE TO make a / partition (also known as a root partition). What I meant was you don't need a separate /home partition, since the folder 'home' will be on the root partition. The same applies to /boot. Later on, you will add a Gentoo entry to Ubuntu's Grub or Lilo configuration, which means you don't have to install another boot loader as part of the gentoo instalation. Also, the handbook takes into account that Gentoo is the only operating sistem you will be using. So no, you don't have to delete any partitions, as long as you have some free space for gentoo's root partition, which gentoo will format as part of the installation (this is mentioned in the handbook). This root partition will probably be formated with the linux ext3 filesistem.

    You can use the swap partition which you already have (Ubuntu's) without a problem. I have a similar setup (Windows, Gentoo and Kanotix, which I used before gentoo), here's how I've got it setup:

    hda1 - Primary partition - NTFS - Windows XP
    hda2 - Extended partition - nothing (just points to the next partitions, this is done automatically)
    hda3,4 - I don't have these, if I did, then hda2 and hda3 would by primary partitions, hda4 would be extended
    hda5 - logical partition - ext3 (I think) - Kanotix
    hda6 - logical partition - FAT32 - small partition for backups, usually just some text files and stuff
    hda7 - logical partition - swap, for both kanotix and gentoo
    hda8 - logical partition - ext3 - gentoo
    hda9 - logical partition - FAT32 - files, all music, linux .iso's, movies, pictures, etc.

    I keep a binder around where I write stuff like this down. It is incredibly usefull! Especially if you have so many partitions I also have the Gentoo installation documents and some Knoppix stuff in there. I suggest you do something along these lines, it's worth it.

  9. #49
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    That's an idea. Maybe once I get a bit more free time, and when I'm at home on my parents computer where I can waste their ink, and their paper. :P

    Anyway, my current setup is this:

    /dev/sda1 - NTFS (entire hard drive is dedicated to Windows, thanks to it being pre-loaded onto my system, and I didn't bother to do a fresh install to make it smaller. Is there a way to downsize it?)

    /dev/sdb1 - ReiserFS (Ubuntu linux, installed as the first partition of my secondary hard drive)

    ldev/sdb2 - swap space

    /dev/sdb3 - my new FAT32 filesystem for all my data (which still resides on Windows as well, in case my FAT drive goes)

    So I should make the following, you think?

    /dev/sdb4 - / (ReiserFS, Ext2, Ext3 or what should it be?)
    /dev/sdb5 - /home (for all the programs I'm gonna compile and any extra data I don't back up right away to the FAT32 partition)

    Is this correct? is there any other partition I should worry about making? How big should / be? You said /home should be around 10 GB, so I'll stick with that figure, or maybe go a bit higher (I'm gonna get GIMP and other programs on Gentoo eventually).

  10. #50
    Linux Guru Juan Pablo's Avatar
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    /dev/sda1 - NTFS (entire hard drive is dedicated to Windows, thanks to it being pre-loaded onto my system, and I didn't bother to do a fresh install to make it smaller. Is there a way to downsize it?)
    Yes, gparted can downsize NTFS partitions, I have done this before and works without problems.
    Put your hand in an oven for a minute and it will be like an hour, sit beside a beautiful woman for an hour and it will be like a minute, that is relativity. --Albert Einstein
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