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Anyone upgraded to vanilla-sources 2.6.20 and tried the kvm virtualization modules? It is merged into the kernel in the 2.6.20 series. It basically uses a modified version of qemu and ...
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  1. #1
    Linux Enthusiast gruven's Avatar
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    KVM and 2.6.20


    Anyone upgraded to vanilla-sources 2.6.20 and tried the kvm virtualization modules? It is merged into the kernel in the 2.6.20 series.

    It basically uses a modified version of qemu and the kvm userspace isn't in portage yet, but I couldn't wait and compiled it myself.

    It is very nice, and quite fast. It still has some problems with video apps, and some bugs, but it is faster than qemu+kqemu.

    I think you have to have a processor with hardware virtualization support, such as the Core Duo and Core 2 Duo (and the AMD with VT support, I don't remember what it is called).

    Just curious. Please chime in if you have tried it!

    http://kvm.sourceforge.net/

    Linux User #376741
    Code is Poetry

  2. #2
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    Kvm

    I decided to not update the kernel, but just build and install KVM from source on my Ubuntu Edgy work station. There were a couple of small issues, like having to install 2 extra packages (one of them gcc-3.4 because the Qemu code doesn't like gcc 4.x ). You have to tell configure that you want to you use gcc-3.4 by adding a command line argument --cc=gcc-3.4.

    Once the build completes successfully, you are ready to install and load the fresh kernel module (sudo modprobe kvm, in case of debian/ubuntu).

    I recently built new hardware based on an Intel duo core 2 cpu and 2GB of RAM.
    This cpu supports Intel VI and the speed of KVM compared to qemu/kqemu is very notable.

    I need a windows system because I need MSVC for development, so I created a Win XP image. This is a very workable system, only VMware player is faster, but not by a large amount. I decided to stop using VMware Player in favour of KVM. I always prefer an open source solution over a proprietary one. VMWare is excellent software but KVM is stable and fast enough right now to be useful and it will hopefully expand its feature set quickly.

    I also created a Fedora Core 6 web server VM. So I am now running a Windows XP and FC6 guest on a standard Ubuntu Edgy host. I configured a bridge and start the guests with tap networking. Here is my command line for the Windows XP guest:

    sudo qemu -hda qemu/winXP.img -hdb qemu/dev.img -m 512 -net nic -net tap

    I have samba running on the linux host and guest, and everybody can talk to everybody, including the VMWare Player guests when I start them up.

    I have 2 small problems left:

    • Every time I boot I need to modprobe the KVM module.
    • My Windows XP Guest wants to check my second hard drive image for errors at every boot. It doesn't find any errors and it doesn't take long but it kind of bothers me.


    Gert

  3. #3
    Linux Enthusiast gruven's Avatar
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    After you modprobe the modules, you can do this:
    Code:
    depmod -a
    update-modules (or modules-update, been a while since I used ubuntu)
    That should update your modules configuration to have it load on startup.

    Like I said, I haven't used ubuntu in a while, but that worked the last time I used it.

    Oh, I also chose to upgrade kernels because 2.6.20 has some Core 2 updates, such as processor arch and the likes.

    Linux User #376741
    Code is Poetry

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