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It's the first theme I've ever made for IceWM, first themes I've ever made for any windowmanager in linux actually. I'd simply like the know if it's worth spending more ...
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  1. #1
    Linux Enthusiast scientica's Avatar
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    Just wonder what you think of this theme


    It's the first theme I've ever made for IceWM, first themes I've ever made for any windowmanager in linux actually.
    I'd simply like the know if it's worth spending more time working on themes or if my theme making should be directed to /dev/null.
    You'll find the theme here:
    http://themes.freshmeat.net/releases/142941/
    Regards Scienitca (registered user #335819 - http://counter.li.org )
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    A master is nothing more than a student who knows something of which he can teach to other students.

  2. #2
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    what? no comment's no flames? or did you send your posts to /dev/null ?
    Regards Scienitca (registered user #335819 - http://counter.li.org )
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    A master is nothing more than a student who knows something of which he can teach to other students.

  3. #3
    jp
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    It's alright but, I wouldn't use it. It doesnt apeal to me.

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    I think it looks good in all except one thing; I don't really like the protruding corners. I am of the opinion that windows should generally be rectangular.
    Would it be possible to get it in an emacs-like color theme? =)

  6. #5
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    not to bad at all...except yes i dont like corners like that either mainly because i like my windows to get as big as possible on my machine. congrats!

  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dolda2000
    I think it looks good in all except one thing; I don't really like the protruding corners. I am of the opinion that windows should generally be rectangular.
    Would it be possible to get it in an emacs-like color theme? =)
    I'll see if I can find the time to reduce the size of the corners (or hide them in the frame). I guess I got a little carried a way by the window shapeabillity

    I don't know emacs, I haven't relly tried emacs (I'm using gvim for my daily needs), how much does it differ from (g)vim, is it better?
    (in other words I don't know the color theme of emacs, but after starting up emacs I guess it's a greyish color theme - btw, I'll be googling for a emacs howto, it took "a few" minutes before I could open a file (kept getting an output like if I'd done a "ll filename" ) - hmm, I just discovered the calendrar(wow, there even popup-menus for the days) and... this look more like a monologue with me as I'm digging in emacs, better finnish this post now :P )


    p.s. @all repliers: thanks for the comments
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  8. #7
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    You haven't used emacs? Oh, poor lost soul.

    I shouldn't be saying this, as many holy wars have been fought over emacs vs. vi, but: DROP VI!! USE EMACS!!

    Check out this screenshot of emacs, along with my otherwise emacs-themed desktop:
    http://www.dolda2000.com/~fredrik/lf...screenshot.png
    It has a few interesting images also, describing the situation between vi and emacs.

    The greatest thing with emacs is its complete and total customizability, since almost the entire program is written in LISP. It's very easy to do almost anything with it. I learned LISP only in order to be able to customize my emacs. The second to greatest thing with emacs is the default keymap, which is so extremely effective that I don't know what I'd do without it.

  9. #8
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    LOL
    Maybe learning LISP is agood idea, any nice newbie tutorials?
    (I found a howto that pointed to the internal tutorial, however the emacs I see when launchng "emacs" in a terminal differs from teh one you have at the screenshot)

    btw, today chirstmas vaccasion starts
    Regards Scienitca (registered user #335819 - http://counter.li.org )
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    A master is nothing more than a student who knows something of which he can teach to other students.

  10. #9
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    Learning LISP is always a good idea, since it's a truly beautiful language. In fact, LISP is so wonderful that I just can't understand why it isn't the de facto scripting language.
    The Emacs LISP manual usually comes with emacs; start emacs and type "C-h i m elisp RET" (C-h being the emacs notation for Ctrl+H). To learn about emacs itself, start emacs and type "C-h t" to bring up the built-in tutorial. The editing keys may seem strange at first, but trust me, once you get used to them, they are divine.

    The reason your emacs differs in appearance is probably since many distros these days for some strange reason ship without the standard Xresources. Run this to remedy the problem:
    Code:
    cat >>~/.Xresources
    emacs*Background: DarkSlateGray
    emacs*Foreground: Wheat
    emacs*pointerColor: Orchid
    emacs*cursorColor: Orchid
    emacs*bitmapIcon: on
    emacs*font: fixed
    emacs.geometry: 80x25
    (Press Ctrl+D here to terminate cat)
    xrdb -merge ~/.Xresources
    For some Emacs LISP examples, you can look at these fragments from my emacs initialization file:
    Code:
    (global-set-key "\C-x4n" 'man)
    (global-set-key "\C-xg" 'goto-line)
    
    (tool-bar-mode 0)
    (menu-bar-mode 0)
    (column-number-mode 1)
    
    (setq user-mail-address "fredrik@dolda2000.com")
    
    (add-hook 'c-mode-hook
    	  (lambda () 
    	    (progn (c-set-style "stroustrup")
    		   (make-local-variable 'make-backup-files)
    		   (setq make-backup-files t))))
    I decided to learn emacs one day since I was pretty sick of pico, and let's just say that I haven't once looked back. The only bad thing is that I've gotten so used to the keymap that I can hardly use other programs anymore. Luckily, Mozilla, bash and GNOME have basic support for emacs-like editing keys. I get into trouble each time I try to use Winbloze these days, though.

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