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Don't get me wrong: I know Blender is OSS and I downloaded it again recently to see the improvements. I agree that it packs a lot of features but there's ...
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  1. #11
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    Don't get me wrong:
    I know Blender is OSS and I downloaded it again recently to see the improvements. I agree that it packs a lot of features but there's a steep learning curve involved. In all fairness it has improved. SOme 'intuitive' features include simply moving the mouse cursor to initiate object translation (moving object). But basic features requires specific knowledge of the software instead of just clicking icons (kinda like driving the car with steering wheel in the glove compartment). Im checking the blender tutorials carefully to get up to speed to attain the ease of use I get with that other 'free' modeling software, Sketchup. Ideally I would like Sketchup to be in that list.

  2. #12
    Just Joined! Dark_Knight's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dalani
    Don't get me wrong:
    I know Blender is OSS and I downloaded it again recently to see the improvements. I agree that it packs a lot of features but there's a steep learning curve involved. In all fairness it has improved. SOme 'intuitive' features include simply moving the mouse cursor to initiate object translation (moving object). But basic features requires specific knowledge of the software instead of just clicking icons (kinda like driving the car with steering wheel in the glove compartment). I'm checking the blender tutorials carefully to get up to speed to attain the ease of use I get with that other 'free' modeling software, Sketchup. Ideally I would like Sketchup to be in that list.
    Maybe I misunderstood you but with most professional software whether for modeling or animation there won't be a one-mouse-click icon that will quickly create a character, car, etc. Most modeling software gives you the ability to start off with basic shapes whether as Polygons or Nurbs and then the rest is up to the artist to shape it into what ever form the artist would like.

    As for the comment on you feeling Blender has a steep learning curve this is normal for most highend software. Unlike most open source projects I'm impressed with the Blender community providing free instructional guides on using the software. I suggest you review the help links found here http://www.blender.org/tutorials-help/

    While I could list every piece of software that attempts to give a Linux solution for modeling and animation I instead kept with my original idea which was to create a list of software both open source and commercial that are intended for professionals and those entering the field such as art students. Unfortunately there's a lot a garbage software out there being passed off as usable for real work when it's really just waisting a users time. Because of this it took me longer to create the list than expected as I had to filter through what was actually usable in a production setting whether as a freelancer or studio.

    As for Sketchup from Google I'm unable to find a Linux port of this modeling software. It currently states it's supported only on Windows and OSX. If someone can direct me to a URL for a Linux port or know for sure that the software works on WINE then send let me know and I'll add it to the list.

  3. #13
    Linux Newbie stubbe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dark_Knight
    Maybe I misunderstood you but with most professional software whether for modeling or animation there won't be a one-mouse-click icon that will quickly create a character, car, etc. Most modeling software gives you the ability to start off with basic shapes whether as Polygons or Nurbs and then the rest is up to the artist to shape it into what ever form the artist would like.
    funny that you say that, reminds me of a great tutorial here

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-O_h6N2Qms4

    As for the comment on you feeling Blender has a steep learning curve this is normal for most highend software. Unlike most open source projects I'm impressed with the Blender community providing free instructional guides on using the software. I suggest you review the help links found here http://www.blender.org/tutorials-help/
    Blender is capable of creating such as those created in the so called "high-end" softwares. With all the features it got, it may even surpass some of the top players. The main problem with blender is just its lack of popularity within the CG Artists community.

    As for Sketchup from Google I'm unable to find a Linux port of this modeling software. It currently states it's supported only on Windows and OSX. If someone can direct me to a URL for a Linux port or know for sure that the software works on WINE then send let me know and I'll add it to the list.
    sketchup is able to run under wine, but a minor problem, all the icons went black. If i move the mouse cursor over them, they're visible again. Anyway you can use sketchup free and import them to blender for further editings.

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  5. #14
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    <<a one-mouse-click icon that will quickly create a character, car, etc.>>

    My field is actually architecture (buildings not computers). I believe Blender can model any shape or volume possible in architecture. But its tools, as you put it in your own statement, where developed with character animation and freeform modeling in mind. Sketchup, out the box, allows immediate creation of geometry better suited to architecture: eg extrude a volume from a polyline than draw and extrude openings on any of its faces. I use Blender at home ( I downloaded recently) and indeed it has more capabilty but I am finding it requires many more steps to do what I consider basic modeling. Wings comes closer to the functionality of Sketchup in extrusions, insetting faces, push-pulling volumes etc... So I kept Wings then I export the model into Blender for rendering.

    Maybe a Python script will surface to allow architectural specific modeling (drawing a polygon on a face to allow extruded opeings without having to manually subdivide, move vertices, delete faces etc...).

    Icons are visible encapsulations of functions; Blender uses them too as text buttons.


    EDIT: I found a python script that allows taking unit measurements in blender

  6. #15
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    Good renderings stubb. You game to render like that if I eventually send you a floor plan and furniture models?? Those materials in blender are a headache..

  7. #16
    Linux Newbie stubbe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dalani
    Good renderings stubb. You game to render like that if I eventually send you a floor plan and furniture models?? Those materials in blender are a headache..
    Not that difficult, really. The basic principle is very similar to every other softwares aswell. Got diffuse, ambient, specular, normal etc. I was (am) a max user, when I begin with Blender I bumped into alot of problems aswell, specially my first blender version is 2.25. Now that's headache. No undo, no sub objects, etc.

    But back then I can already see that blender has full potential to what have become now, a complex software that is comparable to commercial softwares. so I keep tracking and lurking on blender development progress. Today at version 2.43, it rocks. Believe me, not even commercial softwares can catch up with blender development speed. Learning blender is great investment I tell you.

    Alot of complain about blender material too, specially on the datablocks thing. Just worry about those. Let blender manage the so-called "datablocks". If you're strong in logic, you can use nodes aswell to cook your home made materials. How neat is that.

  8. #17
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    Smile Software for 2D/3D artists

    Wow, what a lot of work you have done. Thank you very much, very helpful. Do you know if the Flash software in Linux works well?

    Thanks,
    George

    Quote Originally Posted by Dark_Knight
    Dalani,

    Your question would be best posted in a separate thread. Anyway, Blender features such as what types of modeling is supported can be found here http://www.blender.org/features-gallery/features/ Blender is the best low cost solution (being that it's open source and free) for those looking to enter the modeling/animation field with out having to pay several thousands of dollars on highend production software such as Maya or XSI. My preferred software for 3D work is still Maya but I have spent some time with Blender and find it a worth while addition to an artist's arsenal of tools to tackle both basic projects and complex ones.

    As for your comment on the GUI seeming counter intuitive with the beta release. It's really unfare to judge any software whether open source or commercial based on a developer beta release. After all "beta" releases are meant to work out bugs and improve the software, not to be taken as what the final version will look or function. Blender 2.43 offers a flexible and configurable window layout allowing the user as many screen setups as the user prefers. This flexibility is seen in software such as Maya and XSI to allow ease of transition for artists either relocating to another studio or the studio migrating it's pipeline to different software.

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