Find the answer to your Linux question:
Results 1 to 7 of 7
Hi all, I have an external hard drive in the NTFS file system. I can read it in openSuse 10.2 but cannot write to it. I guess that is normal ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    4

    Question [SOLVED] Problem reading external NTFS drive openSuse 10.2 Windows XP


    Hi all,

    I have an external hard drive in the NTFS file system. I can read it in openSuse 10.2 but cannot write to it. I guess that is normal so so far so good.

    After reading it in openSuse there is a directory that cannot be browsed/read or written to in Windows XP. openSuse can browse all directories in the drive

    I cannot read this specific folder with an XP virtual machine as guest in openSuse or in my laptop with native XP SP2. Other folders in the drive open fine.

    Any clues?

    Thanks in advance,

  2. #2
    Linux User SkittleLinux18's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Mesa, AZ
    Posts
    308
    Quote Originally Posted by j.lencart View Post
    Hi all,

    I have an external hard drive in the NTFS file system. I can read it in openSuse 10.2 but cannot write to it. I guess that is normal so so far so good.

    After reading it in openSuse there is a directory that cannot be browsed/read or written to in Windows XP. openSuse can browse all directories in the drive

    I cannot read this specific folder with an XP virtual machine as guest in openSuse or in my laptop with native XP SP2. Other folders in the drive open fine.

    Any clues?

    Thanks in advance,
    Hey and welcome to the forums! Do me a favor. Open up a terminal and type:
    sudo fdisk -l
    Post the output here.
    Using Linux since June 2007
    Distros: Mint 16 KDE
    SPECS: AMD Atholon 64 X2 3.2 Ghz, 4GB RAM, GeForce GTS 250 1GB VRAM
    When your whole life is on one computer, servers and all, choose stability over anything else.

  3. #3
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    4
    Here it goes

    Code:
    Disk /dev/sda: 500.1 GB, 500107862016 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 60801 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    
       Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
    /dev/sda1               1         262     2104483+  82  Linux swap / Solaris
    /dev/sda2   *         263        2873    20972857+  83  Linux
    /dev/sda3            2874       60801   465306660   83  Linux
    
    Disk /dev/sdb: 500.1 GB, 500107862016 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 60801 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    
       Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
    /dev/sdb1               1       60801   488384001   83  Linux
    
    Disk /dev/sdd: 320.0 GB, 320072933376 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 38913 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    
       Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
    /dev/sdd1               1       38913   312568641    7  HPFS/NTFS
    [

  4. #4
    Linux User SkittleLinux18's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Mesa, AZ
    Posts
    308
    My bad! Dude, that is perfect, but I forgot to tell you to post the contents of your fstab file. In your file browser, navigate your root folders to /etc ---> fstab. Open it in a text editor. Copy the contents and paste it here.

    Or in a terminal, type:

    nano /etc/fstab
    Using Linux since June 2007
    Distros: Mint 16 KDE
    SPECS: AMD Atholon 64 X2 3.2 Ghz, 4GB RAM, GeForce GTS 250 1GB VRAM
    When your whole life is on one computer, servers and all, choose stability over anything else.

  5. #5
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    4
    fstab contents
    Code:
    /dev/sda2            /                    ext3       acl,user_xattr        1 1
    /dev/sda3            /home                ext3       acl,user_xattr        1 2
    /dev/sda1            swap                 swap       defaults              0 0
    proc                 /proc                proc       defaults              0 0
    sysfs                /sys                 sysfs      noauto                0 0
    debugfs              /sys/kernel/debug    debugfs    noauto                0 0
    usbfs                /proc/bus/usb        usbfs      noauto                0 0
    devpts               /dev/pts             devpts     mode=0620,gid=5       0 0
    /dev/sr0            /media/DVDROM         auto       defaults,user,noauto  0 0
    
    c2:/home        /c2     nfs     defaults,user,noauto 0 0
    c3:/home        /c3     nfs     defaults,user,noauto 0 0
    c4:/home        /c4     nfs     defaults,user,noauto 0 0
    c6:/home        /c6     nfs     defaults,user,noauto 0 0
    c6:/disk2       /c6_d2  nfs     defaults,user,noauto 0 0
    c7:/home        /c7     nfs     defaults,user,noauto 0 0
    c8:/home        /c8     nfs     defaults,user,noauto 0 0
    c8:/disk2       /c8_d2  nfs     defaults,user,noauto 0 0
    c9:/home        /c9     nfs     defaults,user,noauto 0 0
    c10:/home       /c10    nfs     defaults,user,noauto 0 0
    c11:/home       /c11    nfs     defaults,user,noauto 0 0
    c11:/disk2      /c11_d2 nfs     defaults,user,noauto 0 0
    c10:/disk2      /c10_d2 nfs     defaults,user,noauto 0 0
    c12:/home       /c12    nfs     defaults,user,noauto 0 0
    c12:/disk2      /c12_d2 nfs     defaults,user,noauto 0 0
    
    c14:/home       /c14    nfs     defaults,user,noauto 0 0
    c28:/home       /c28    nfs     defaults,user,noauto 0 0
    
    
    /dev/sdb1            /disk2               ext3       user,acl,user_xattr   1 2
    #/dev/sdc1            /disk_ext            ext3       acl,user_xattr        1 2
    #/dev/sdd1            /media/smdisk        ext3       acl,user_xattr        1 2

  6. #6
    Linux User SkittleLinux18's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Mesa, AZ
    Posts
    308
    First, check your repos to make sure your ntfs-3g packages are installed. If not, install them. Once that is done, edit the fstab file in a terminal by typing:

    nano /etc/fstab
    scroll down to you sdd1 entry and replace it with this:

    /dev/sdd1 /media/smdisk ntfs-3g defaults,umask=0 0 0
    Once that is done, type:

    sudo mount -a
    Using Linux since June 2007
    Distros: Mint 16 KDE
    SPECS: AMD Atholon 64 X2 3.2 Ghz, 4GB RAM, GeForce GTS 250 1GB VRAM
    When your whole life is on one computer, servers and all, choose stability over anything else.

  7. #7
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    4

    Thumbs up Solved!

    Hi again,

    installed the ntfs-3g packages and got write access to the ntfs external from the openSuse side. This did not work very well and mounting the thing in NTFS resulted in not being able to umount it (something to do with my kernel version).

    I got hold of a Win XP Pro and went into the advance security policy. Somehow plugging the unit in openSuse set the culprit folder as owened by somebody. The only thing I had to do was to take ownership of the folder and change the access parameters.

    Thanks anyway,

    J.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •