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  1. #1
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    Problem moving disk from one machine to another


    Hi, I have an 80GB Seagate disk which has been written in one Linux system (running Debian Etch - Linux 2.6.18 ). When I move the disk to my antiquated but still servicable Pentium II machine, running the same version of Debian, fdisk reports the same info recognizes the disk, but it cannot be mounted (mount says Can't find an ext2 filesystem on dev hdc.).

    The old machine has a BIOS that cannot handle disks over 32 GB in size, but I don't think this is the problem, as the disk reads fine in the newer machine both with and without the 32 GB clipping jumper on the drive. Also, I get the same problem even if I disable the drive completely in the BIOS in the old machine, with or without the jumper - Linux can see it but not mount it.

    Could it be that the IDE controllers on the two motherboards access the drives differently which causes the perceived geometry of the disks to be different?

    Looking at hdparm, I've noticed some differences between the machines, most notable IO_support (0 for the old one, 1 for the new), don't know if that could make a difference.

    I can supply more info if it is helpful, thought don't want to dig out a multitude of specs etc at this stage until its actually needed.

    Any suggestions would be welcome.

    /Ricard

  2. #2
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    Not my area of expertise, but a guess.

    fdisk or Parted reads the partition table, but does that mean that the limits of the BIOS might not be a problem.

    If you burn a copy of the Knoppix live-cd and run it, will it find, mount and read a selection of the files on the disk and what size does it report the partitions as they are mounted?

    I am thinking that fdisk is reading a partition table at he beginning of the HDD that records a size that the Bios will not allow to be accessed.

  3. #3
    SuperMod (Back again) devils casper's Avatar
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    Post the output of fdisk -l command here.
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  5. #4
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    On the machine which won't mount properly:


    $ fdisk -l /dev/hdc

    Disk /dev/hdc: 80.0 GB, 80026361856 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 9729 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

    Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    /dev/hdc1 1 9729 78148161 83 Linux


    /Ricard

  6. #5
    SuperMod (Back again) devils casper's Avatar
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    On the machine which won't mount properly:
    I am not getting it. Are you trying to mount partition or trying to boot up machine from the same partition?

    Is there any other harddisk plugged in? What error message does it throw at boot up?
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  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by devils casper View Post
    I am not getting it. Are you trying to mount partition or trying to boot up machine from the same partition?

    Is there any other harddisk plugged in? What error message does it throw at boot up?
    Just trying to mount the disk, it's not used for booting, just for data. No errors at boot.

    Ugh. I figured it out. Shameful it is. I should be fried in my own sauce and eaten for dinner. I finally realized that I have been attempting to mount /dev/hdc, not /dev/hdc1 . The drive has been formatted with a partition table, although I've got the whole disk as one partition (dunno if it's possible to do it any other way, probably no advantage if it could be). Guess I've been mounting too many CDROMs to remember to use the partition number, especially when there is only one partition on the disk.

    So, sorry for the noise.

    /Ricard

  8. #7
    SuperMod (Back again) devils casper's Avatar
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    Its alright. You can edit /etc/fstab file to mount that partition permanently.
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