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OK, step by step instructions wold be great! I don't want to make this worse than it is....
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  1. #11
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    OK, step by step instructions wold be great! I don't want to make this worse than it is.

  2. #12
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by magic-chef View Post
    OK, step by step instructions wold be great! I don't want to make this worse than it is.
    Ok.

    1. Boot liveCD or recovery disc and login as root.
    2. Create mount point: mkdir /mnt/mydisc
    3. Mount the drive partition you are checking out. Assuming it is /dev/sda1: mount /dev/sda1 /mnt/mydisc
    4. Did it mount ok, then do this.
    Code:
    1. Unmount the device: umount /dev/mydisc
    2. Run fsck without fixing the file system: fsck -f -n /dev/sda1
    3. If any errors, try to recover all your data.
    
    
    Code:
    1. Re-mount the partition in read-only mode: mount -r /dev/sda1 /mnt/mydisc
    2. Mount external drive, such as USB hard drive or thumb drive.
    3. Try to copy data to USB drive.
    4. If data copied OK, you are ready to repair the partition.
    4a If not, then copy as much as you can and determine if the missing data is critical.
    4b If missing data is critical, hopefully you have a backup copy somewhere.
    3a. If no errors, then you are probably golden.
    4a. If it didn't mount ok, then do this:
    Code:
    1. Make sure drive is unmounted: umount /mnt/mydisc
    2. Run fsck: fsck -f -y /dev/sda1
    3. Try to mount the drive in read-only mode: mount -r /dev/sda1 /mnt/mydisc.
    4. Try to recover your data as described above
    If there were no problems with the drive, or ff there were problems and fsck was able to fix them, you are ready to reboot your system and restore your recovered data (if any) back to the drive.

    I don't know what I missed. Are there any other eyes on this?
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  3. #13
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    Have you made a back up ? If not and it has important data do a backup now before Rubberman 9:12am post. It is something I have never done so will not suggest the needed steps. Who ever helps will need to know just what hdd(s) with enough space on it. Post output of 'fdisk -l' l=small L, plus unused space on each partition/drive.

  4. #14
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    I agree with Lostfarmer ! Post the output of fdisk -l and df -h commands before doing anything.
    Code:
    sudo fdisk -l
    df -h
    It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.
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  5. #15
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lostfarmer View Post
    Have you made a back up ? If not and it has important data do a backup now before Rubberman 9:12am post. It is something I have never done so will not suggest the needed steps. Who ever helps will need to know just what hdd(s) with enough space on it. Post output of 'fdisk -l' l=small L, plus unused space on each partition/drive.
    I made a strong recommendation to him in a previous post to make a bit-image backup of the drive first.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  6. #16
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    Thank you all. I will work on this tonight when I arrive home.

    I will also post any output requested.

  7. #17
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    I ran into problems right away.

    Code:
    mkdir /dev/sda1 produced the following:
    mkdir: cannot create directory 'dev/sda1 : file exists
    
    mount /dev/sda1 produces the following
    mount: can't find /dev/sda1 in /etc/fstab or /etc/mtab
    Does this help?

  8. #18
    Linux Guru Jonathan183's Avatar
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    You need to create the folder to mount the partition to ...
    Code:
    mkdir /mnt/mydisc
    then mount the partition to the folder
    Code:
    mount /dev/sda1 /mnt/mydisc
    Ed: and to unmount the partition
    Code:
    umount /dev/sda1

  9. #19
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    I also ran the fdisk -l command and received the following info:

    Disk /dev/sda: 160 GB,
    255 Heads, 62 sectors/track, 19457 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280

    Device Boot Start end blocks ID System
    /dev/sda1 * 1 2432 19535008+ 83 Linux

    /dev/sba2 2433 2675 1951897+ 82 Linux Swap / Solaris

    /dev/sda3 2676 19457 134801415 93 Amoeba


    Snip{disk and track info}


    /dev/sdb1 1 38913 312568641 83 Linux



    This was hand typed so I apologize for any spelling errors in advanced. Also, the line breaks in the list above we added for clarity.

  10. #20
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by magic-chef View Post
    I ran into problems right away.

    Code:
    mkdir /dev/sda1 produced the following:
    mkdir: cannot create directory 'dev/sda1 : file exists
    
    mount /dev/sda1 produces the following
    mount: can't find /dev/sda1 in /etc/fstab or /etc/mtab
    Does this help?
    No. That won't work. I think you misunderstood me. See Jonathan183 below. You cannot create a device in /dev - only drivers normally do that. You want to create a regular directory in the system file space, such as /mnt/mydisc.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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