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Originally Posted by magic-chef Well, Ive had the first good fortune so far. The partition "sda3" which is reporting as "Amoeba" filesystem type can be mounted and read (this was ...
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  1. #31
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by magic-chef View Post
    Well, Ive had the first good fortune so far. The partition "sda3" which is reporting as "Amoeba" filesystem type can be mounted and read (this was my home directory and has all the data that I need)!!!

    A couple of questions:

    1) Should I try to repair the system area (sda1) or just re-install the system and re-format sda1 & sda2, leaving sda3 alone?

    2) If #1 is solution how do I handle the "Amoeba" filesystem issue? See above posts.

    In closing, thanks to all for the help! I tried other forums and this is the only forum where I received any meaningful help.

    This is not the end...but, I think I might be able to see it from here.
    Since you can mount it, back it up to an external drive - you can create a compressed tarball of the directory tree and store that on the external drive. Then, you can unmount it, run fdisk /dev/sda and change the partition id of the Amoeba partition to 83 (Linux). After that, you can run fsck on /dev/sda3 and see what, if any, errors you get.

    You can reinstall/repair your system. If I had a lot of additional software installed and such, then the time to reinstall everything might be excessive. If not, then re-installation might be a good approach to take. Once you have reinstalled the OS, if /home has not been nuked, you are home (sic) free. If it does get reformatted by the installation process, then you can simply restore your data from the backup tarball. In my case, it would take so long to restore my system from scratch that I make a bit-image backup copy of my system boot drive pretty regularly (every couple of weeks). That way, if something catastrophic happens, I can restore the system pretty quickly (about an hour). Which reminds me that I am overdue for my regular backup!
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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    I booted up with Ubuntu Live this time (the distribution I was running) and ran fsck as described in a previous post. There were tons of errors on sda1.

    sda3 is my /home which is what I want to protect.

    Could I back this up to a smaller hd (if it has the room) and how?

    If I can back this up I will re-install and bite the bullet.

  3. #33
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    If you have another drive / file system in the computer that has enough space, then create mount points for both of them, mount them, and copy the files from the old drive to the backup. Something like this:

    Code:
    mkdir /mnt/bad /mnt/goot
    mount /dev/sda3 /mnt/bad
    mount /dev/sdb1 /mnt/good
    cd /mnt/bad
    tar -cvf /mnt/good/bad.tar .
    When you have reinstalled everything, if you need to restore the data, it will be on that other drive in the bad.tar file.

    Note: the code above assumes that the data you want to save is on /dev/sda3 and the drive where you have space to save it is on /dev/sdb1. Also, the trailing dot for the tar command above is needed, as it tells tar that you want to backup the current directory where the command is run from. I hope this is all clear enough for you.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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    I just discovered that one of the home directories (another system user) has no data! Most of my directory is still intact.

    Ideas?

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    Another thought on the missing data in the user directory......I was looking at it through the systemrescuecd boot. Could this still be related to the Amoeba issue....just guessing?

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    Quote Originally Posted by magic-chef View Post
    I just discovered that one of the home directories (another system user) has no data! Most of my directory is still intact.

    Ideas?
    Other than a full-fledged data recovery service, not really. You can dump a bit-image of the partition to backup and use a file dump tool to extract data the hard way... Text data isn't too hard to find if you have some strings to search on. I've done that before, but it's time-consuming and totally no fun! In fact, back in 1981 I and a friend had a small telephone service business, installing and fixing PBX's in the SF Bay area. The computer that we wrote up our quotes and estimates on was a TRS-80 w/ floppy drives. The OS, TRS-DOS, was so buggy that it kept munging the disc directories, so that I spent many a sleepless night doing sector dumps and patches to recover the quotes we inevitably had to deliver the next day. Doing that, I had to reverse-engineer the internal structure of the disc file system, so when I found the correct data, I could attach it back to the appropriate directory entry. I can still do hex math in my head as a result. Gah!
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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    sdb1 is of sufficient size (250GB available) to the handle the backup. The /home directory is reporting about 25GB (I don't know if this includes the "missing" content in the other user directory).

    Does the target drive have to be empty or can the backup be saved to a directory?
    What is the command I need to use?

    (I am using Ubuntu)

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    Quote Originally Posted by magic-chef View Post
    sdb1 is of sufficient size (250GB available) to the handle the backup. The /home directory is reporting about 25GB (I don't know if this includes the "missing" content in the other user directory).

    Does the target drive have to be empty or can the backup be saved to a directory?
    What is the command I need to use?

    (I am using Ubuntu)
    Backing up to a directory is just fine - you just need to create the tarball much as I described to you in a previous post, but in the directory you want. That would be found in /mnt/good/whateverdiryouwant, ok?
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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    I can't get the CAT command to work. Do I need sudo privileges to perform the task.

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    Quote Originally Posted by magic-chef View Post
    I can't get the CAT command to work. Do I need sudo privileges to perform the task.
    You pretty much need to do all this stuff as root. If you are running Ubuntu which hasn't enabled the root account, you can switch to root with this command: sudo su -
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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