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I recently installed Kubuntu 9.04 + Nvidia driver 180.44 on my Dell Latitude E6400 (1440x900) with NVIDIA Quadro NVS 160M. I have the G2410 1920x1080 external monitor. The monitor is ...
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  1. #1
    Just Joined! undoIT's Avatar
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    [SOLVED] Nvidia - Keep external monitor settings between reboots


    I recently installed Kubuntu 9.04 + Nvidia driver 180.44 on my Dell Latitude E6400 (1440x900) with NVIDIA Quadro NVS 160M. I have the G2410 1920x1080 external monitor. The monitor is connected via VGA. I am very pleased to have the monitor running at full resolution. However, the settings don't stay intact after rebooting.

    If I have the monitor connected and turn on the the laptop, only the laptop screen is active. Then, I press Fn + F8 twice to switch to the external monitor which is always reset to 1440x900. After logging in I open Nvidia settings and switch the external monitor resolution to auto. There is a warning about Meta modes and I do auto fix. Then compositing is disabled, so I open system settings, turn off then turn back on desktop effect. Also, if I want to switch back to the laptop display, it stays stuck at 1920x1080 on the laptop.

    Is there any way to set this up so it is automatically detected when the external monitor is plugged in and runs at the correct resolution? With my old M1330 and Intel X3100 graphics card, it would do this and was very convenient switching back and forth between the laptop display and external monitor.

  2. #2
    Administrator MikeTbob's Avatar
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    Have you tried launching the nvidia-settings control from the command line as root user or in your case, use sudo nvidia-settings. Once that launches you should be able to click the tab X Server Display Configuration>Configure seperate X screen and then save it to X configuration file once you get it set to your liking.
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  3. #3
    Just Joined! undoIT's Avatar
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    I tried copying and pasting the xorg.conf preview from nvidia-settings to /etc/X11/xorg.conf (because there is an error when trying to save with my user account), which I believe accomplishes the same thing. After rebooting, i was given a TTY screen instead of KDM login. Had to restore the backup xorg.conf. Am I right that this is the same as the procedure you suggested? Also, isn't xorg.conf mostly deprecated as of *buntu 8.10 Intrepid?

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  5. #4
    Administrator MikeTbob's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by undoIT View Post
    I tried copying and pasting the xorg.conf preview from nvidia-settings to /etc/X11/xorg.conf (because there is an error when trying to save with my user account), which I believe accomplishes the same thing. After rebooting, i was given a TTY screen instead of KDM login. Had to restore the backup xorg.conf. Am I right that this is the same as the procedure you suggested? Also, isn't xorg.conf mostly deprecated as of *buntu 8.10 Intrepid?
    Yes, it should be the same process, no matter which way you do it. The only reason it wouldn't let you do it is because you weren't su - or sudo user.

    And yes xorg.conf has been deprecated, but not entirely......X will use xorg.conf if you have one but it doesn't need it anymore.
    I'm not sure why you get a TTY login instead of KDM, is there any other differences between the current xorg.conf and the backup?
    I do not respond to private messages asking for Linux help, Please keep it on the forums only.
    All new users please read this.** Forum FAQS. ** Adopt an unanswered post.

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  6. #5
    Just Joined! undoIT's Avatar
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    It doesn't seem that the xorg.conf file is changed when nvidia-settings is changed. Here is the current xorg.conf file as I type this with the external monitor on:

    Code:
    # xorg.conf (X.Org X Window System server configuration file)
    #
    # This file was generated by dexconf, the Debian X Configuration tool, using
    # values from the debconf database.
    #
    # Edit this file with caution, and see the xorg.conf manual page.
    # (Type "man xorg.conf" at the shell prompt.)
    #
    # This file is automatically updated on xserver-xorg package upgrades *only*
    # if it has not been modified since the last upgrade of the xserver-xorg
    # package.
    #
    # Note that some configuration settings that could be done previously
    # in this file, now are automatically configured by the server and settings
    # here are ignored.
    #
    # If you have edited this file but would like it to be automatically updated
    # again, run the following command:
    #   sudo dpkg-reconfigure -phigh xserver-xorg
    
    Section "Monitor"
    	Identifier	"Configured Monitor"
    EndSection
    
    Section "Screen"
    	Identifier	"Default Screen"
    	Monitor		"Configured Monitor"
    	Device		"Configured Video Device"
    	DefaultDepth	24
    EndSection
    
    Section "Module"
    	Load	"glx"
    EndSection
    
    Section "Device"
    	Identifier	"Configured Video Device"
    	Driver	"nvidia"
    	Option	"NoLogo"	"True"
    EndSection
    
    Section "ServerFlags"
    	Option	"DontZap"	"True"
    EndSection
    Here is the xorg.conf file suggested by nvidia-settings:

    Code:
    # nvidia-settings: X configuration file generated by nvidia-settings
    # nvidia-settings:  version 1.0  (buildd@crested)  Sun Feb  1 20:25:37 UTC 2009
    
    # xorg.conf (X.Org X Window System server configuration file)
    #
    # This file was generated by dexconf, the Debian X Configuration tool, using
    # values from the debconf database.
    #
    # Edit this file with caution, and see the xorg.conf manual page.
    # (Type "man xorg.conf" at the shell prompt.)
    #
    # This file is automatically updated on xserver-xorg package upgrades *only*
    # if it has not been modified since the last upgrade of the xserver-xorg
    # package.
    #
    # Note that some configuration settings that could be done previously
    # in this file, now are automatically configured by the server and settings
    # here are ignored.
    #
    # If you have edited this file but would like it to be automatically updated
    # again, run the following command:
    #   sudo dpkg-reconfigure -phigh xserver-xorg
    
    Section "ServerLayout"
        Identifier     "Default Layout"
        Screen      0  "Screen0" 0 0
        InputDevice    "Keyboard0" "CoreKeyboard"
        InputDevice    "Mouse0" "CorePointer"
    EndSection
    
    Section "Module"
        Load           "glx"
    EndSection
    
    Section "ServerFlags"
        Option         "DontZap" "True"
        Option         "Xinerama" "0"
    EndSection
    
    Section "InputDevice"
        # generated from default
        Identifier     "Keyboard0"
        Driver         "kbd"
    EndSection
    
    Section "InputDevice"
        # generated from default
        Identifier     "Mouse0"
        Driver         "mouse"
        Option         "Protocol" "auto"
        Option         "Device" "/dev/psaux"
        Option         "Emulate3Buttons" "no"
        Option         "ZAxisMapping" "4 5"
    EndSection
    
    Section "Monitor"
        Identifier     "Configured Monitor"
    EndSection
    
    Section "Monitor"
        Identifier     "Monitor0"
        VendorName     "Unknown"
        ModelName      "DELL G2410"
        HorizSync       30.0 - 83.0
        VertRefresh     56.0 - 76.0
    EndSection
    
    Section "Device"
        Identifier     "Configured Video Device"
        Driver         "nvidia"
        Option         "NoLogo" "True"
    EndSection
    
    Section "Device"
        Identifier     "Device0"
        Driver         "nvidia"
        VendorName     "NVIDIA Corporation"
        BoardName      "Quadro NVS 160M"
    EndSection
    
    Section "Screen"
        Identifier     "Default Screen"
        Device         "Configured Video Device"
        Monitor        "Configured Monitor"
        DefaultDepth    24
    EndSection
    
    Section "Screen"
        Identifier     "Screen0"
        Device         "Device0"
        Monitor        "Monitor0"
        DefaultDepth    24
        Option         "TwinView" "0"
        Option         "TwinViewXineramaInfoOrder" "CRT-0"
        Option         "metamodes" "CRT: nvidia-auto-select +0+0"
        SubSection     "Display"
            Depth       24
        EndSubSection
    EndSection

  7. #6
    Just Joined! undoIT's Avatar
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    Working

    Update on this. Running nvidia settings as root and saving the X configuration does work. Not sure why that is different than what I did before. Anyhow, you just need to run nvidia-settings with either kdesudo or gksudo and then save and reboot. Now the setting are sticking between reboots

  8. #7
    Linux Newbie sarlacii's Avatar
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    Hey undoIT, I had the same problem. The Nvidia tool does not automatically ask for root privileges, so when run as a normal user and hit the "save xorg.conf" button, it cannot, as you do not have permissions to create/modify the file. Solution is as you report, to run as root.

    And yes, the latest xorg doesn't need the conf file, but it will as MikeTbob says listen to it if it is there... and I prefer to have it as that way you know what you are going to get! LOL There is a way via the xorg logs to get a copy of your currently running config by rebuilding the conf file from logs (Linux Format April had a nice write up).

    Also, it's nice that your display switcher works via Fn+F8... my Acer doesn't have a complete keyboard mapping, so it's all done by me via a manual script that I wrote to switch between xorg configs! Go well... .
    Last edited by sarlacii; 05-15-2009 at 08:37 PM. Reason: grammar...
    Respectfully... Sarlac II
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    This is the phenomenon of time dilation.
    The faster you run, the younger you look, to everyone but yourself.

  9. #8
    Administrator MikeTbob's Avatar
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    BRAVO!!
    Well done brother and congrats. I knew it had to be something simple and I will make a mental note to keep this info handy for future references.
    I do not respond to private messages asking for Linux help, Please keep it on the forums only.
    All new users please read this.** Forum FAQS. ** Adopt an unanswered post.

    I'd rather be lost at the lake than found at home.

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