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I have a quad-core 2.6 GHz processor. However, /proc/cpuinfo shows my speed as 1300 Mhz for all 4 cores. Does anybody know what might cause this. My BIOS properly reports ...
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  1. #1
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    cpu MHz


    I have a quad-core 2.6 GHz processor. However, /proc/cpuinfo shows my speed as 1300 Mhz for all 4 cores. Does anybody know what might cause this. My BIOS properly reports my speed at 2.6Ghz.

    Thanks,

    Dave
    - EndianX -

  2. #2
    Linux Newbie thesimplecreator's Avatar
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    What processor and linux distribution do you have?
    Microsoft isn't evil, they just make really crappy operating systems.
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  3. #3
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    - EndianX -

  4. #4
    Linux Newbie thesimplecreator's Avatar
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    Did you get the 32-bit or 64-bit version of ubuntu, im not sure but that my be your problem if you got the 32-bit version.
    Microsoft isn't evil, they just make really crappy operating systems.
    Linus Torvalds

    Personal and politically centrist blog.--->
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  5. #5
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    I would expect this is due to cpufreq - CPU speed is scaled according to processor load.

    You can Google for plenty of info.

  6. #6
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    Post the output of uname -a command here.
    Code:
    uname -a
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  7. #7
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    You might have cpufreq scaling enabled (cpuspeed)

    Take a look in /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu0/cpufreq (in fedora anyway)

    What you are intrested in is :
    scaling_available_frequencies
    scaling_available_governors
    scaling_cur_freq
    scaling_governor
    On mine I get:

    scaling_available_frequencies = 1900000 1800000 1000000
    scaling_available_governors = ondemand userspace performance
    scaling_cur_freq = 1000000
    scaling_governor = ondemand

    You change scaling_governor to performance by

    echo "performance" > scaling_governor

    This should make the cpu run st max speed.
    In a world without walls and fences, who needs Windows and Gates?

  8. #8
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    Thank you blinky. That was just what I needed.
    - EndianX -

  9. #9
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    Why would you want the cpu to always run at the max speed? It's an useless waste of energy if the cpu is completely iddle.

  10. #10
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    I don't know. I probably don't need to. The reason I was looking to speed it up was I assumed it was running at that speed all the time.

    How quickly will it increase to its full value if processesing power is needed?
    - EndianX -

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