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Hi, im trying to clone my ubuntu system installed in a laptop in case the laptop crashes. But, first of all: when i try to restore the system in a ...
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  1. #1
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    Best app to backup my system and not having problems with the new hardware


    Hi,

    im trying to clone my ubuntu system installed in a laptop in case the laptop crashes.

    But, first of all: when i try to restore the system in a new PC, could be incompatibilities because the hardware of the broken laptop and the new laptop is different?

    I dont mind if i have to buy another laptop with the same processor type (i386, etc), but, for example, the type of the RAM could be cause of problems?

    So what would be the best to backup my system and not having problems with the new hardware?

    cp?, rsync?, dd?, clonezilla?, partimage?

    Regards

    Javi

  2. #2
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    In the immortal words of the sage, "it depends"...
    Current linux systems can deal with hardware changes pretty easily - disc configurations are the most problematic. Myself, for backup/restore purposes I simply make a bit-image copy of the system drive to an external USB drive - a procedure that has saved me on numerous occasions over the past many years. I can restore the system image by booting with a live CD/USB drive and writing the image back to the system disc. However, this has always been most effective when the hardware is the same, or identical. I've used this method to recover from serious Windows viruses and hard drive failures.

    So, what you do should be predicated on what you need to do. If cloning a system is your intent, then Clonezilla is a very good option. If recovery from disaster is your intent, then a bit-image backup is more appropriate.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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