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So now that possibility is out of the way, has anyone got any other suggestions why the filesystem check fails intermitantly? I've read various posts where people have had exactly ...
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  1. #11
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    So now that possibility is out of the way, has anyone got any other suggestions why the filesystem check fails intermitantly? I've read various posts where people have had exactly the same problem, and there doesn't seem to have been any definitive answers why this happens?

    The inconsistency is what makes me think there is a hardware problem.
    All the below are similar cases to mine:

    Arch Linux Forums / Filesystem Check Failed !!!
    "File system check failed" Error message... - Ubuntu Forums
    EeeUser Forum / File system check failed

    (sorry if pasting links from other forums isn't allowed... but it is illustrating my problem)

    All the links recommend fsck -fy and similar commands when it happens, so this is what I will try next time I boot/reboot and it happens.

    Scott.

  2. #12
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    Right,

    It failed the check again this morning when I booted, so I typed the root password and tried the following:

    e2fsck -p /dev/sda4
    and it just gave the same error as during the first fail.
    I tried:

    fsck -f
    which just brough loads of help commands up

    fsck.ext3
    which just brough the same help commands up
    and then I tried:

    /sbin/fsck -fy
    which did exactly the same as the last 2.


    Anyone got any ideas?

    Scott.

  3. #13
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Try fsck -c -f /dev/sda4 but remember that the file system needs to be unmounted, just in case... Anyway, I would assume that if fsck failed on boot that it won't mount that file system, but I could be wrong, depending upon what you did after that.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  4. #14
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    Hello,

    I think I've finally sorted the problem. After speaking with my brother, he said that he had a similar problem a while back.

    The problem is due to the hard drive names changing, which is why UUID was developed if I am right in thinking?. So my 150gig IDE storage drive was being renamed as sda and therefore thinking that this drive was the drive where linux should be (because my linux partition is usually named /dev/sda4)... thus causing it not to pickup a filesystem (because the IDE drive is just a ntfs storage drive) and as a result the filesystem check fails.

    The fix simply involves renaming all the drives in /etc/fstab using their UUID's like:
    /dev/disk/by-uuid/8d486842-560d-48f9-8f1c-1d483092ed08 / ext3 defaults 0 1
    rather than simply putting:
    /dev/sda4 / ext3 defaults 0 1
    in fstab.

    More information on how to do this is found in the Archwiki under Persistent Block Device Naming which can be found either by searching the wiki for the former or at this link: Persistent block device naming - ArchWiki.

    This appears to have fixed the problem, and ive rebooted and done system halts numerous times to see if the filesystem check fails on boot anymore, and so far so good. But as this is an intermitant problem I can't be 100% sure at the minute, so I will leave this post as unsolved for the moment until ive tested it for a couple more days.

    Such a simple problem to fix, but a difficult one to diagnose.


    Thanks so much for all your help people, I really appreciate your patience,
    Scott.

  5. #15
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Rather than the UUID, it is better to use a label. That way, if you need to move your data to a new disc (a bigger one perhaps?), you can give it the same label and you won't have to change your /etc/fstab. You can use tune2fs to set/change the label on an ext2/ext3 file system.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  6. #16
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    In any case, adding external drives to a system can change the name of a drive in /dev, so using /dev/sdXN or /dev/hdXN in /etc/fstab is problematic at best. As mentioned, using the UUID is also not advisable since you would have to change fstab should you move that file system to a new drive. With labels, all that futzing around goes away.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  7. #17
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    Labelling the drive is exactly what my brother suggested to do, and exactly what he said he does. For now I will leave them as UUID's, but once I have got Arch fully working the way I need it to work, I will go back and label the drives properly. Doing it by labels also makes putting the drives in fstab a hell of a lot easier I guess, because sorting the UUID's out is just a nightmare.

    Thanks so much Rubberman, I appreciate it .
    Scott.

  8. #18
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Well, it sounds like you are back on track. Good luck!
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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