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Given the grub/grub2 difference, if you can't change boot order in bios, chain loading might be the only way. Something like this might work in the 8.0.4 menu.lst: title Ubuntu ...
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  1. #11
    Linux Enthusiast Mudgen's Avatar
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    Given the grub/grub2 difference, if you can't change boot order in bios, chain loading might be the only way. Something like this might work in the 8.0.4 menu.lst:

    title Ubuntu on sdb
    root (hd1,0)
    chainloader +1

    hd1 will need to be defined in 8.0.4 /boot/grub/device.map, should look like:
    (hd1) /dev/sdb

    If you can successfully boot using this entry, you can then change the default line in 8.0.4 menu.lst to point to it. You can use a string:
    default="Ubuntu on sdb"

  2. #12
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    No bios ....

    In my few years working with computers (Coco 2, 8088 anyone) I have not come accros a computer that did not allow boot order selection. I have seen some where you select the drive or a particular partition.
    Sometimes you highlight the drive that you want and use the + or - keys to move the selection up or down in the list. Other time you use the PgUp or PgDn, yet there are others that you use the F6/F7 ect.
    If your user manual do not help you, visit the Manufacturer's web site.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by lefty01 View Post
    Many new computers allow you to change the boot order momentarily by pressing one of the Function keys while booting.
    At work I press F9 but at home my computer uses F12.
    See your user manual for your particular model.
    Not many new computers but ALL computers (less than 10 years old?) have a key sequence that allows access to the BIOS settings, yes, you can most probably "google" the make and model of your PC to find out the exact sequence as many do indeed differ.

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  5. #14
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    If you can't change Boot Order in BIOS, change default OS in GRUB Menu.
    If you are using Boot Loader of Ubuntu 10.04, edit /etc/default/grub file and if its Ubuntu 8.10, edit /boot/grub/menu.lst file.
    It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.
    New Users: Read This First

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    Linux Newbie previso's Avatar
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    Weird as in not American Megatrends, Award, or Phoenix BIOS.

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    Quote Originally Posted by greyhairweenie View Post
    Given the grub/grub2 difference, if you can't change boot order in bios, chain loading might be the only way. Something like this might work in the 8.0.4 menu.lst:

    title Ubuntu on sdb
    root (hd1,0)
    chainloader +1

    hd1 will need to be defined in 8.0.4 /boot/grub/device.map, should look like:
    (hd1) /dev/sdb

    If you can successfully boot using this entry, you can then change the default line in 8.0.4 menu.lst to point to it. You can use a string:
    default="Ubuntu on sdb"
    I've tried it.
    It shows me 'Ubuntu on sdb' title, but when I am clicking it, It gives me following error -
    Error 13: Invalid or unsupported executable format.

    I've used sda as a master and sdb as a slave.

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    Quote Originally Posted by shinystar View Post
    I've tried it.
    It shows me 'Ubuntu on sdb' title, but when I am clicking it, It gives me following error -
    Error 13: Invalid or unsupported executable format.

    I've used sda as a master and sdb as a slave.
    One more thing, I've checked that I am not able to mount the sdb on sda as It is complaining
    mount: Unknown filesystem type ext4.

  9. #18
    Linux Enthusiast Mudgen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by shinystar View Post
    I've tried it.
    It shows me 'Ubuntu on sdb' title, but when I am clicking it, It gives me following error -
    Error 13: Invalid or unsupported executable format.

    I've used sda as a master and sdb as a slave.
    I know it's not a solution, but for troubleshooting purposes have you tried switching the SATA cables to make sure sdb is (still?) indeed bootable when the boot order is not an issue?

  10. #19
    Linux Enthusiast Mudgen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by shinystar View Post
    One more thing, I've checked that I am not able to mount the sdb on sda as It is complaining
    mount: Unknown filesystem type ext4.
    That's to be expected. ext4 is default now, but did not arrive in Ubuntu until 9.04.

  11. #20
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    Ya, I've checked power and data cables and it is working fine. The other drive(sdb) is bootable. If I use it as a master drive.

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