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I'm looking for something that is able to determine if an electrical single is present or not through Linux perferrably. The senerio I'm trying to figure out... I have a ...
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  1. #1
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    Home electrical circuit monitor?


    I'm looking for something that is able to determine if an electrical single is present or not through Linux perferrably.

    The senerio I'm trying to figure out... I have a hydronic heating system and I want to be able to do some kind of reporting to which zones are requesting heat (I have 3 zones) and at which time of day, also comparitive to the temperature outside.

    So, in the simplest broken down form, I just need a way to determine if the zone sensor is on, or if a signal has been sent to it. I know the voltage (24v) of the circuit and I have the temperature thing already solved.

    Most of this is done in perl, I just don't have a way to get the information to the system that the zone has been tripped by the thermostat.

    So does anyone know of a way to determine or watch a eletrical circuit or query if the circuit is powered in Linux?

  2. #2
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    I think you need some sort of sensor that talks to an A-D converter that your system can query. There are quite a few of these on the market. I have an ARM PC-104 system board that runs Linux which has all of that on-board, so I could connect it to a 24v circuit and read the values, converting the digital values to some temperature or voltage value. The board costs about $150USD - 200MHz ARM w/ 64MB RAM, 100mbps ethernet, dual USB ports, 4 RS-232 ports, etc. It would be ideal for this sort of stuff. You can find a number of these boards here: Technologic Systems PC/104 Single Board Computers and Peripherals
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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