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I've noticed a strange issue with the touchpad in my 1005ha netbook. I have a dual-boot environment set up between Linux and WinXP. Whenever I am in Windows, reboot and ...
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  1. #1
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    Strange touchpad behavior after Windows reboots to Linux (1005ha)


    I've noticed a strange issue with the touchpad in my 1005ha netbook.
    I have a dual-boot environment set up between Linux and WinXP. Whenever I am in Windows, reboot and go into Linux, then touch two points on the touchpad (like doing a two-finger scroll) the cursor goes haywire, flying every which way. It may possibly occasionally click, too (text and such occasionally is highlighted, as if it's being click and dragged) but I believe this is more the result of an interpreted double-tap-then-hold (which is equivalent to click-hold-and-drag).
    This is not really a problem since I rarely go into Windows anyway, but I figure it's worth mentioning. If you have any ideas, I am willing to experiment to find a solution.

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    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    It's possible that there is some configuration information left in flash memory that is confusing Linux. Try a hard reset of the system after shutting down Windows to see. IE, shut down system, remove battery, unplug external power, hold power-on button/switch for at least 15 seconds. Then, reinstall battery and power up normally.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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    If I understand you right, that's unnecessary. If I shut Windows down (either by pressing the button, or selecting "shut down" --even a cold boot) and turn it back on into Linux, it works fine. It only happens when I 'reboot' from Windows.

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    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ryokimball View Post
    If I understand you right, that's unnecessary. If I shut Windows down (either by pressing the button, or selecting "shut down" --even a cold boot) and turn it back on into Linux, it works fine. It only happens when I 'reboot' from Windows.
    That just reinforces my opinion that it is cruft left in memory between reboots, which is erased when you do a cold reboot. In any case, stuff left in flash will persevere even on a full shutdown/reboot. Since that is not your situation, then it is in volatile memory. However, Linux is still seeing that and getting "confused" as a result. So, my recommendation is that you do a full shutdown and reboot when switching between Windows and Linux. Generally, I always run Linux and if I need Windows I run that in a VirtualBox VM on the Linux host. Less trouble, at least for me!
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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    I admit that i have not really tried running a VM of any sort on my netbook... I don't think I want to try, though :P It's only there so I can play Morrowind, after all, so I'm probably better off just remembering to shut it down. Thanks

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    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    I run XP on my Dell laptop. I give it 2GB or the 4GB RAM the system has, and 1 core (it's a dual core system), so it runs just fine, and Linux is still snappy. There are a couple of applications that I use that need to run natively on Windows, so this gives me that option, without needing to reboot the system.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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