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Hi Guys, I am in the need of a driver, or something to allow me to use a USB sound device built into my Mackie ProFX12 Mixer unit. The web ...
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  1. #1
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    Mapping a Mackie ProFX12 USB Sound Device


    Hi Guys,

    I am in the need of a driver, or something to allow me to use a USB sound device built into my Mackie ProFX12 Mixer unit.
    The web site only lists Windows and Apple drivers, and nothing for Linux distros.
    I am using this mixer solely with a Linux system and is required.
    The mixer sound device is used to run a community radio station. The purpose of using the built in sound device was to eliminate the need to run another sound card, having it all in one tidies the station up, and cable loses.

    OS is CentOS 5.5 on either of 2 platforms, IBM ThinkCenter or Dell Optiplex (which should not be the problem)
    Plenty of processor power.
    I don't know what Sound chip is being used. If there is a way to find out, proding it, could you let me know how to do it and I will include it in a replay?

    Any help would be grateful. Currently I have a good mixer only being used for 50% of the deatures.

    Regards
    Kevin.

  2. #2
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    I'm not familiar with this hardware, but if there are not FOSS drivers for it for CentOS 5.x, then you might try a RHEL 6 clone, such as Scientific Linux 6. There is much better hardware support for such stuff in the newer kernels. I agree, that the basic platform (IBM ThinkCenter or Dell Optiplex) is not the issue. The issue is support for the device. CentOS is a clone of Red Hat Enterprise Linux, as is Scientific Linux. The kernel, 2.6.32+ that RHEL6 and clones use, has much better support for such hardware. No guarantees, but it is worth checking out. If you want, I will look at the 2.6.32 kernel to see if such is supported. Can you please post the output of the command (as root) 'lspci' here?

    For whatever it is worth, CentOS 6 is conspicuous by its unavailability. I have not heard when they plan on releasing it, and I track CentOS closely. I used it (CentOS 5) for a number of years, but switched to Scientific Linux (SL) 6 early this year when it was apparent that CentOS 6 would not be available in the foreseeable future, and I needed the additional hardware support that the newer kernel supplied.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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    Thanks for the info, did go to Scientific Linux's web-site, does look interesting, the problem I have is the App that I am using is assembled to run on CentOS, and comes as a install (fresh) for the PC.
    You mention about posting the output of the command, could you please advise the way to get this information? And then I will add it to another reply.

    Regards Kevin.

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    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sparcnz View Post
    You mention about posting the output of the command, could you please advise the way to get this information? And then I will add it to another reply.
    Open a terminal/console/command-line window, and do this:
    Code:
    # the su command will ask for root password
    su
    # lspci will list all pci devices. If your device is a USB device, then use the command 'lsusb' instead.
    lspci
    Then, highlight the output text and drop it here in a reply.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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    HI,

    Sorry for not getting back to you I have been on long day shifts for the past days.
    I have tried the command you sent and the PC that I am running says this command does not exsit. My other linux PC running SUSE 10.2 does work. I will need to change the USB over to this machine and see what is reports back. Maybe I need to somehow install "LS" to then have that command?
    I am nights for the next 2 days so I will report back after that, if that's okay?
    Unless I find another way to read on the current PC.
    Regards Kevin.

  7. #6
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    To Rubberman and other Reading,
    I was able to get the PC to see the USB audio device in my mixer.
    Updating to a newer OS, in this case CentOS was able to locate and install the required drivers.
    I have been able to check and audio dies play out.
    Now to get it fully working.
    Regards Kevin, and thanks.

  8. #7
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    So, since CentOS (version 5.x?) does support the lspci command, try that again, and post output here. Knowing what the actual device is at the hardware level may help us to give better advice.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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