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I have an older desktop computer I don't use much anymore except for testing distro's, and (I think) it overheated and shut down. Blew out the dust, found a fan ...
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  1. #1
    Linux Engineer MASONTX's Avatar
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    Overheat problem


    I have an older desktop computer I don't use much anymore except for testing distro's, and (I think) it overheated and shut down. Blew out the dust, found a fan that had quit working and replaced it, and replaced the thermal compound, thought that would do it, but it is still (I think) overheating after about 30 minutes with only firefox open browsing the internet, and the case off. ( I say I think it is overheating, because I saw temps in the 60's shortly before it shut down.) My next suspect is the power supply, but it being a shuttle computer, it is a long thin power supply rather than a square one. That means a cheap fix is out of the question. New ones go for $40-45. Is there an easy way to see if it is the power supply, or another cuprit to chase down? The bummer is that I just upgraded to 2 Gigs of ram, so this project is quickly getting to be more expensive than the old unit is worth. I could have bought a refurbed unit of comparable performance for what the ram and a new power supply would cost.
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  2. #2
    Linux Newbie reginaldperrin's Avatar
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    I would install lm-sensors:
    "sudo apt-get install lm-sensors"
    Run the detector:
    "sensors-detect", answer yes appropriately.
    Run the program:
    "sensors"

    This will give terminal output of temps and voltages. Certainly see if the psu is old and crapping out.
    All this is assuming, of course, that the older mobo etc has actual sensors built into it!

    Hope this helps

  3. #3
    Linux Engineer MASONTX's Avatar
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    Thank you reg, I'll try that when I have time to mess with it again.
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  4. #4
    Linux Engineer MASONTX's Avatar
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    Turns out sensors was already included in the distro, I just had to start it. Unfortunately it only gave me temps, not electrical info on the PS. Temps just before shut down were 60 C/104F, so it's not an overheat problem. I guess unless I can figure out how to check the PS easily, I'll put this unit in my "Someday I'll rebuild it with more up to date components " pile. Of course I still have my 286, 386, 486, 133, and 4 or 5 others in that pile. It's getting pretty big and the wife is starting to complain.
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  5. #5
    Linux Newbie reginaldperrin's Avatar
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    Oh well, kinda sad. But those piles of bits make good.... ummm... I was trying to think of things they'd be good for, and I can't think of any

  6. #6
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
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    Well they'd be great for building a frankenputer
    What do we want?
    Time machines!

    When do we want 'em?
    Doesn't really matter does it!?


    The Fifth Continent

  7. #7
    Linux Engineer MASONTX's Avatar
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    Solved. I was given a "dead" computer (HD failed, PSU good) so I pulled the PSU and set it on the table next to my shuttle and hooked it up to the mother board. It ran for over an hour with no shutting down, so I will call this solved, a bad PSU. Now to gut the free computer, put the PSU back in it, and move my shutttle MB etc. to the new franken puter.
    Registered Linux user #526930

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