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I thinking of a new build, and I know that Steam will be coming to Linux soon, and I will wanna game on this computer. Games like the latest games ...
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  1. #1
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    What are he best Graphics cards for Linux?


    I thinking of a new build, and I know that Steam will be coming to Linux soon, and I will wanna game on this computer. Games like the latest games when they are available on Steam for Linux. Like Skyrim, and Battlefield 3.

    I know something like Nvidia is not so good with Linux. When I was updating my Dads computer, using Ubuntu, I upgraded the Graphics, and got the black screen of death.

    What are the best supported graphics cards for Linux?

  2. #2
    oz
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    I've been running Linux for about 12 years now, and have always used nVidia based video cards with no problems to report thus far. I've heard that ATI card users run into lots of issues when running them under Linux, but I've never tried them since there has never been any good reason to switch.
    oz

  3. #3
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    Nvidia Cards work most of the time and drivers updates for Linux are released regularly too. I agree with oz. ATI support is not that good.
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    Quote Originally Posted by oz View Post
    I've been running Linux for about 12 years now, and have always used nVidia based video cards with no problems to report thus far. I've heard that ATI card users run into lots of issues when running them under Linux, but I've never tried them since there has never been any good reason to switch.
    I guess I may have just had bad time with that driver update in Ubuntu. Thanks for the response.

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    I have used ATI/AMD cards with Linux for at least 8-12 or more years... I do now also have an Nvidia, ATI like Nvidia you need the proprietary driver. Once you install it is is, or at least for me not any easier to use one or the other. When I had a ATI Fire 77oo 3D workstation card I got needed help from ATI/AMD to help me figure that out. It was a strange story I will recount it since I had to put up a few posts about it.

    There was no way for the ATI/AMD Fire workstation card to work once I installed Linux on the box. I found I had to remove the ATI/AMD workstation card, install a mainstream ATI card or if there had been built in video that works too, Install Linux and then AFTER installing the ATI/AMD proprietary driver for Linux with the mainstream video card in the box, set-up the ATI/AMD driver (known as Catalyst) before you shut down. Then after shutting down replace the mainstream video solution with the workstation card. All good then. Somewhere in either this forum and/or LinuxQuestions I posted the whole adventure I think... That was the only time I had any issues with ATI/AMD video cards.

    Nvidia though? I had trouble with 2 Nvidia based Linux installs over the last year or so. Once I am assuming it was due to it being a very new card in my new MSI gaming notebook. After waiting 4 months it was resolved and worked with a newer update to Linux, etc. The first time was with a HP xw9400 workstation with dual Nvidia fx 4500 cards. I had more problems since using the dual Nvidia set-up and never a issue with the ATI workstation.

    Both ATI/AMD and Nvidia are keeping secrets about their drivers... It is really too bad since we as users have no choice but contend with the whims and desires of the average windows gamers and the money heavy 3D players. It feels to me as we Linux users have been the "Red Headed Step Children" of the computing world. We have to make our way, knowing any hand me downs have been cast-offs of others. As long as this is the case I think there will be plenty of people, especially users new to *nix.

  6. #6
    Linux User Steven_G's Avatar
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    Just make sure that you stay faaaaaaaaaaaaaaar away from any Nvidia card (or any other card) with any of the newest "power saving" technology. On laptops Nvidia calls it "Optimus" and there's another name for it on desktop cards, but it's the same thing. (I *think* ATI puts out a card with some similar crap.)

    The tech replaces the hard mux with a soft mux. It basically drops the DGPU in to a virtual server, renders and then pipes it out. This can cause all kinds of problems. Trust me, I know, I made the mistake of buying one. You're looking at having to get all kinds of hackalicious to get the stupid things working. And even when you get it all hacked up it's still just close, but no cigar. Supposedly everybody upstream is doing cartwheels because the 3.8 kernel is supposed to the "the one" to support this crap. Although they had cartwheels about 3.5 supporting it OOB a few months back. And I had to hack it 9 ways to Sunday.

    And Nvidia is locked in a spitting contest with a bunch of linux folks over how to export the rendering. Nvidia wants to export in a proprietary format and the *nix folks want it exported under GPL and last I read neither side was ready to give an inch. Unfortunately this crap is supposed to be the "next big thing" and lots of companies are supposedly going to start replacing the hard mux with a soft mux.

    If that happens we're gonna have a lot of headaches until the kernel catches up and all the gurus and execs climb down off their high horses and iron something out.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steven_G View Post
    Just make sure that you stay faaaaaaaaaaaaaaar away from any Nvidia card (or any other card) with any of the newest "power saving" technology. On laptops Nvidia calls it "Optimus" and there's another name for it on desktop cards, but it's the same thing. (I *think* ATI puts out a card with some similar crap.)

    The tech replaces the hard mux with a soft mux. It basically drops the DGPU in to a virtual server, renders and then pipes it out. This can cause all kinds of problems. Trust me, I know, I made the mistake of buying one. You're looking at having to get all kinds of hackalicious to get the stupid things working. And even when you get it all hacked up it's still just close, but no cigar. Supposedly everybody upstream is doing cartwheels because the 3.8 kernel is supposed to the "the one" to support this crap. Although they had cartwheels about 3.5 supporting it OOB a few months back. And I had to hack it 9 ways to Sunday.

    And Nvidia is locked in a spitting contest with a bunch of linux folks over how to export the rendering. Nvidia wants to export in a proprietary format and the *nix folks want it exported under GPL and last I read neither side was ready to give an inch. Unfortunately this crap is supposed to be the "next big thing" and lots of companies are supposedly going to start replacing the hard mux with a soft mux.

    If that happens we're gonna have a lot of headaches until the kernel catches up and all the gurus and execs climb down off their high horses and iron something out.
    I just got the Gigabite GTX 650 TI OC 2GBDDR5 video card. I heard that most Nvidia cards will work with Linux. How well do you think this card will work with Linux Mint 14?

  8. #8
    Linux User Steven_G's Avatar
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    Well you either did your research or you got lucky. Nvidia released a driver to support the new TXAA rendering format in *nix. So you might be able to get it to work OK. It looks like some of the drivers are still in Beta. But at least they're working on it. Although you may not be able to get the card to work in FXAA rendering mode. It looks like support for that is still bleeding edge, even in doze. But looking at the specs this thing looks like a straight up gaming beast. I don't think they were thinking about saving power when they built it and it does not look like it has any of the new power saving soft mux crap in it. So you *should* be OK.

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    I am running Dream Studio with a Nvidia GTX 660M GPU on a MSI Gaming Notebook and while I had A LOT of trouble several months ago the latest Ubuntu based distro works with it just fine now...

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