Find the answer to your Linux question:
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12
So I'm trying to figure out how to mount this hard drive (because that's apparently what you do?), but I just cannot figure out what is going on in the ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    6

    Need to mount external hdd to transfer files (complete newbie)


    So I'm trying to figure out how to mount this hard drive (because that's apparently what you do?), but I just cannot figure out what is going on in the slightest.

    Basically, I have a really old computer I put lubuntu on because a friend gave it to me to take apart/put back together. It had a virus on it and was completely dead. So this is my first experience with anything other than Windows except for the, I dunno, 3 times I've handled a Mac? This is not the computer I use though.

    My external hard drive told me when I plugged it in that it needed to be reformatted. I just lost my other external hard drive recently, and this was my last hope of getting the information (I'd had it in both places, for the most part). I had no idea it would do this. I looked online and found a suggestion that maybe using Linux would work?

    So I got a new hard drive (and that seems to auto mount), but I cannot for the life of me figure out what to do. I've looked at several tutorials that all go about things different ways, and not only did none of them seem to work, but I had no idea what any of them really meant in the first place. If someone could walk me through this or something, it would be much appreciated. I've got videos on here that I made 10 years ago and pictures from my only trip I've ever taken out of the country. I had them on two drives, and they both decided to die on me together (though in different ways).

    I'm not even sure if it's possible to do this if it's... corrupted (or whatever's wrong with it). I'm just trying to find some sliver of hope.

    The only thing I know is that the drive is spinning and powering on (unlike my last one), and Linux appears to recognize that it's plugged in (based on being able to find "Hitachi" several places in my many attempts to figure out what I was doing).
    Last edited by slytherclaw; 01-08-2013 at 02:36 AM. Reason: extra info

  2. #2
    Trusted Penguin
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    4,353
    Hello and welcome!

    So some more diagnostic info would be of help first. First open a terminal. You should find an application shortcut via the system menu. If you are running the GNOME desktop, you could also press Alt+F2 to open a "run" box, then enter gnome-terminal and press enter.

    Now in that terminal window, show us the output of these commands:

    Code:
    # show attached disks and their partition tables
    sudo fdisk -l
    Code:
    # show mounted partitions
    df
    Code:
    # show disk automount config file
    cat /etc/fstab
    you may also need to run dmesg and pipe the output to grep and look for certain disk info, but more on that after you post some info.

    You may also want to check on the health of drives using the smartctl command. again, depends upon your drives attached, but might be like:
    Code:
    sudo smartctl -H /dev/sdb
    Also, there are Linux "Rescue Distributions" available that go out of their way to make things like disk recovery much easier. Two of note are:


  3. #3
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    6
    Code:
    sudo fdisk -l
    Code:
    Disk /dev/sda: 80.0 GB, 80000000000 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 9726 cylinders, total 156250000 sectors
    Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
    Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x0008e10a
    
       Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
    /dev/sda1   *        2048   154157055    77077504   83  Linux
    /dev/sda2       154159102   156248063     1044481    5  Extended
    /dev/sda5       154159104   156248063     1044480   82  Linux swap / Solaris
    
    Disk /dev/sdb: 1000.2 GB, 1000204886016 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 121601 cylinders, total 1953525168 sectors
    Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
    Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0xaf8ac8c4
    
       Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
    /dev/sdb1              63  1953520064   976760001    7  HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
    
    Disk /dev/sdc: 1500.3 GB, 1500267937792 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 182397 cylinders, total 2930210816 sectors
    Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
    Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x0006b3b4
    
       Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
    /dev/sdc1            2048  2930210815  1465104384    7  HPFS/NTFS/exFAT


    Code:
    df
    Code:
    Filesystem      1K-blocks    Used  Available Use% Mounted on
    /dev/sda1        75866208 2664620   69347716   4% /
    udev               504676       4     504672   1% /dev
    tmpfs              204780     756     204024   1% /run
    none                 5120       0       5120   0% /run/lock
    none               511944       0     511944   0% /run/shm
    /dev/sdc1      1465104380 4992836 1460111544   1% /media/My Passport


    Code:
    cat /etc/fstab
    Code:
    # /etc/fstab: static file system information.
    #
    # Use 'blkid' to print the universally unique identifier for a
    # device; this may be used with UUID= as a more robust way to name devices
    # that works even if disks are added and removed. See fstab(5).
    #
    # <file system> <mount point>   <type>  <options>       <dump>  <pass>
    proc            /proc           proc    nodev,noexec,nosuid 0       0
    # / was on /dev/sda1 during installation
    UUID=c019dde3-b922-4b63-b131-d69ef72ccf4a /               ext4    errors=remount-ro 0       1
    # swap was on /dev/sda5 during installation
    UUID=6ff86792-a083-4743-b398-dff8be88d5ef none            swap    sw              0       0


    The last one you entered says "command not found"


    Note: "My Passport" is the new drive, which I'm not having any problems accessing. It's the one I'm trying to transfer the other's info on to.

  4. #4
    Linux Guru
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Tucson AZ
    Posts
    3,190
    Your information in the last post shows you have three drives. An 80GB drive with Lubuntu and a 1TB drive as well as a 1.5TB drive, each of which has one windows partition. If I understand correctly, you want to copy/transfer some data to the 1.5TB drive. Is that correct? Where do you want to transfer it from? The 1TB drive. If that's the case, it should not be difficult unless the drive is bad. Post back and someone should explain how to mount each partition and transfer data.

  5. #5
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    6
    The 80gb drive is the internal one running Linux.
    The 1tb drive is the old external drive I cannot get to work on Windows because it says I need to reformat (this is the drive I want to get the information off of)
    The 1.5 tb drive is the new external drive that I can easily access on both Windows and Linux (this is where I want to put the info from the other one)

    Note: I am only using Linux as a means to transfer the data. I want it to be something I can use on my Windows computer. I don't know if this will cause any issues or differences in how I approach things.

  6. #6
    Linux Guru
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Tucson AZ
    Posts
    3,190
    sdc1 is your 1.5TB which is mounted on Lubuntu at /media/My Passport
    The bad drive from which you want to copy from is sdb1. You would first need to create a mount point to see if you can access the data. Open a terminal and enter:

    Code:
    sudo mkdir /media/sdb1
    Then mount it:

    Code:
    sudo mount -t ntfs /dev/sdb1 /media/sdb1
    Open a filemanager and navigate to the /media/sdb1 folder to see if your files/folders are visible. If they are, you can try copying them but you will need to do that as root user, using the sudo command to open the file manager or doing it from a terminal with sudo. I believe the default file manager for Lubuntu is pcmanfm so if you are more comfortable using a gui run this in a terminal: sudo pcmanfm
    It should open the filemanager with root privileges so you can copy data if it is still there. Report back if you have problems.

  7. #7
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    6
    This is what I got.
    Failed to mount '/dev/sdb1': Input/output error
    NTFS is either inconsistent, or there is a hardware fault, or it's a
    SoftRAID/FakeRAID hardware. In the first case run chkdsk /f on Windows
    then reboot into Windows twice. The usage of the /f parameter is very
    important! If the device is a SoftRAID/FakeRAID then first activate
    it and mount a different device under the /dev/mapper/ directory, (e.g.
    /dev/mapper/nvidia_eahaabcc1). Please see the 'dmraid' documentation
    for more details.
    I know it explains stuff there, but I don't understand it, so it doesn't really help me, heh.

  8. #8
    Linux Guru
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Tucson AZ
    Posts
    3,190
    The first option ' NTFS is inconsistent' might be resolved by running 'chkdsk /f' command (without quotes) from a command prompt from whatever windows operating system you have. Note, reboot windows twice as instructed.

    Follow the instructions if you have RAID, if you don't know if you have it then most likely you don't as it is something you would have to set up.
    The other option is hardware failure and the only possibility I know to recover data is to use TestDisk which is on the SystemRescueCD, link in post 2 above. Make sure you read up on how to use before you begin.

    Good Luck!

  9. #9
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    6
    When am I supposed to reboot? Beforehand? It just confuses me. And what would running it do?

  10. #10
    Linux Guru
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Tucson AZ
    Posts
    3,190
    The error you posted shows there is a problem with the filesystem on sdb1

    NTFS is either inconsistent
    The suggested 'possible' solution for this is to run the command: chkdsk /f

    That command is to check the disk for errors and 'possibly' repair them. You need to run it from windows as indicated. So boot into windows and get to a command prompt. You know you never told us which version of windows you are using!! You type that command and let it run. It will probably take some time. When it has finished reboot the computer to whichever windows distribution you have installed and log in. Then simply reboot and do it again. I don't know why that is necessary. It might be helpful if you told use which windows you are using.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •