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Hello, I just installed the 2nd hard drive on my Ubuntu Studio computer. I see when I turned my computer on it did not instantly reconize the new hard drive. ...
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  1. #1
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    How to set up new hard drive?


    Hello,

    I just installed the 2nd hard drive on my Ubuntu Studio computer. I see when I turned my computer on it did not instantly reconize the new hard drive. I did a little research on this and now I know I have to set it it up with a new file system.

    I'm kind of a noob with this kind of stuff, so do you think you can help me out with this? Thanks for answering.

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    If the hard drive is empty you would need to create a partition or partitions and a filesystem for each. You can create partitions with fdisk or with gparted if you have it installed. What are you intending to use the drive for?

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    Quote Originally Posted by yancek View Post
    If the hard drive is empty you would need to create a partition or partitions and a filesystem for each. You can create partitions with fdisk or with gparted if you have it installed. What are you intending to use the drive for?
    I intend to use this drive just to store files in. Things like videos documents. It's a secondary drive for my computer.

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    oz
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    If you don't have any experience partitioning for Linux, the easiest route would be to use gparted. You can install it on your box if not already installed, or you can run it from a liveCD such as Parted Magic. It gives you a GUI to work with so you can see what's going to happen before you commit to the changes, and it's pretty good about letting you know if you are trying to do certain things incorrectly. Instructions for using it can be found on the Parted Magic website.
    oz

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    Also to be clear, Like I said, I am a noob to all of this. I have never added a new hard drive to a computer. I'm fairly new to linux, and do not know of all these terms. "fdisk" and "gparted" "Fat32" and all that. I see them but do not know what them mean. So, a little background infromation about how I will be using this hard drive.

    Linux is my main operating system. More specifically, Ubuntu Studio 12.04 on the Xfce desktop environment is my main operating system. I just build this computer and for now my main use with this computer is Linux. If I want to get windows on this computer, I will go and get another hard drive souley intended for Windows use. This way I have all the space I could ever need souley for one operating system. But I do not intend on doing this for a long while, and Windows is something I need. (Highly doubt it will be something I need with how successful Linux has been going).

    So, I know that I only need one partition for this hard drive. (I want the whole 1TB to be used souley for Ubuntu Studio 12.04.). I will be using VirtualBox from time to time, but that's still in my main operating system, so no real partitions will be needed. (Virtual partitions i think they call it).

    So with all this said, I'm a noob to the terminal in linux. Now that you know some more information, do you think you can help me out?

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    Quote Originally Posted by oz View Post
    If you don't have any experience partitioning for Linux, the easiest route would be to use gparted. You can install it on your box if not already installed, or you can run it from a liveCD such as Parted Magic. It gives you a GUI to work with so you can see what's going to happen before you commit to the changes, and it's pretty good about letting you know if you are trying to do certain things incorrectly.
    What do you think of this guide?
    https://help.ubuntu.com/community/In...gANewHardDrive

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    Quote Originally Posted by oz View Post
    If you don't have any experience partitioning for Linux, the easiest route would be to use gparted. You can install it on your box if not already installed, or you can run it from a liveCD such as Parted Magic. It gives you a GUI to work with so you can see what's going to happen before you commit to the changes, and it's pretty good about letting you know if you are trying to do certain things incorrectly. Instructions for using it can be found on the Parted Magic website.
    You know, actually, I think for the first time I do this I will go with the GUI way, just as a little training guid. On another computer if/when I will try the other way. (I'm still looking at the guide brought to me by Ubuntu help forums.)

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    Okay, I'm up at this step. The Ubuntu forums tell me to just create a new partition by right clicking on the white box. However, there is no white box, and when I try to create a new partition, it says no table was found. When I try to make a new table I am shown this message.Screenshot - 01202013 - 11:20:25 PM.jpg

    Nothing is on this hard drive. (sdb) I am also told about the default is to creat a MS-DOS partition table. I... Don't know exactly know what that means. By doing this... What will happen?

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    It's hard to see the image but it looks like it says this will erase all data on the disk. That is the expected output. Make sure you have the correct drive. After this, you should see /dev/sdb (if that is the device you are planning to use) and unallocated space below it in the main window. You click the unallocated space and then click Partition at the top and in the drop-down menu New. It gives you options to set the size and filesystem type which will probably be ext4. You also need a mount point. If you know you have the correct device you should have no problem proceeding.

  11. #10
    oz
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    Quote Originally Posted by CurtisCoburn View Post
    Nothing is on this hard drive. (sdb) I am also told about the default is to creat a MS-DOS partition table. I... Don't know exactly know what that means. By doing this... What will happen?
    As already noted above, the instructions for using Gparted can be found on the Parted Magic website. You'll need to create a partition table for the new drive if you haven't done that already. Click on "Device" in the menu and select the appropriate partition table for your device. Then you can proceed with setting up partitions and formatting them.

    Additional documentation can be found on the Gparted website:

    http://gparted.sourceforge.net/displ...me=help-manual

    http://gparted.sourceforge.net/documentation.php

    When it comes to partitioning, using gparted will be about as easy as it gets.
    oz

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