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I'm running Mandrake 10.1 community on a machine I just salvage a few days ago. There's an extra motherboard lying around my house, and possibly an extra graphics card. I'd ...
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  1. #1
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    Will new hardware break an old machine?


    I'm running Mandrake 10.1 community on a machine I just salvage a few days ago. There's an extra motherboard lying around my house, and possibly an extra graphics card. I'd like to know, in general, if you swap out something like the motherboard, will the kernel or another part of the distribution complain? I'm not sure how hardware-dependent the installation and configuration are. To my knowledge, the system's not using any drivers external to the distro package, except for a wireless adapter.
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    I'dd like to know that too actualy, I know that on windows it's a automatic re-install... but what about Linux
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  3. #3
    Linux Guru Vergil83's Avatar
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    I have changed video cards, sound cards, and dvd drives and never had a problem. You may have to reconfigure something, though, it shouldn't break the system.

  4. #4
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    For little devices like this no worries... Im thinking about what if you change your MB... im pretty sure this is a re-install
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  5. #5
    Linux Guru sarumont's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by UgoDeschamps
    For little devices like this no worries... Im thinking about what if you change your MB... im pretty sure this is a re-install
    No, it's not. This is not Windows. Free your minds from that M$ brainwashing: YOU DON'T EVER HAVE TO REINSTALL LINUX. That's right, kids. Even the worst breakages *can* be fixed without a re-install.

    Before you put your new motherboard in, recompile your kernel to include support for the chipset that is on the new motherboard. Also include the drivers for any new features that the new mobo has (USB2.0, IEEE1394, etc.). Add this to your lilo/grub menu (don't delete the old kernel) and make sure you have a liveCD handy just in case. Install the new hardware, boot the new kernel and all should be fine.

    In the case that you forgot something or had the chipset wrong, boot the LiveCD and recompile your kernel correctly from a chroot on the LiveCD.
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    Wow thanks a bunch sarumont... I'm keeping this thread saved in case I go throu some big change in the future!!....

    Quote Originally Posted by sarumont
    No, it's not. This is not Windows. Free your minds from that M$ brainwashing: YOU DON'T EVER HAVE TO REINSTALL LINUX. That's right, kids. Even the worst breakages *can* be fixed without a re-install.
    I know, I know... I have to remove my way of trying to think about the worst scenarios Linux is great no dought about it...
    \"Meditative mind\'s is like a vast ocean... whatever strikes the surface, the bottom stays calm\" - Dalai Lama
    \"Competition ultimatly comes down to one thing... a loser and a winner.\" - Ugo Deschamps

  7. #7
    Linux User Muser's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sarumont
    No, it's not. This is not Windows. Free your minds from that M$ brainwashing: YOU DON'T EVER HAVE TO REINSTALL LINUX. That's right, kids. Even the worst breakages *can* be fixed without a re-install.
    there is no spoon. don't think you can, know you can.

    YAHH MATRIX QUOTES!!

    anyways, when i moved my system into a total new case, w/ a new mobo, ram, and cpu, i had no problem. booted normally and configured itself for the changes.

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    I'll probably switch today to test it, but I'm only borrowing the memory for the board so it won't become permanent until later. It's not like simply running it under the new board would change the configuration, right? There aren't any wizards running behind my back on this one?

    How would I add in support for the chipset? Is that a driver that I'd have to download, unzip, and read the readme to use, or would something like that be right in the kernel make's menuconfig? Is there a utility that ships with mandrake that would automatically add this sort of support?
    \"Nifty News Fifty: When news breaks, we give you the pieces.\" - Sluggy Freelance

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    Linux Enthusiast puntmuts's Avatar
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    I didn't use Mandrake for ages, so I could be wrong on this.
    If you are using the default kernel which came with the distribution you will have a good chance that things will work. If you are using a customized kernel without a broad support for hardware, recompilation of the kernel could be necessary.
    There is a possibility you will have to reconfigure X.
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  10. #10
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    1. Changing the motherboard won't affect much configuration, although if you had a very hardware specific, custom kernel you'll need to recompile it. If you use a kernel provided by a distrobution, or you compiled support for lots of hardware into it, you probably won't need to do anything- the kernel will simply load the appropriate modules.
    2. Changing the CPU won't matter much unless you change brandnames/processing abilities. The most obvious would be changing to a 64-bit chip. Also, if you use a custom system, such as a stage 1 or a stage 2 Gentoo install, you'll probably have to recompile the entire system if you had processor class specific CFLAGs set.

    What it really comes down to is how hardware specific you customized your system.
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