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ok, so here is my situation. i have a maxtor (seagate) central axis NAS (network attached storage) that went bad. i pulled the 1 GB hard drive from inside of ...
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  1. #1
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    cannot read linux hard drive pulled from a NAS


    ok, so here is my situation. i have a maxtor (seagate) central axis NAS (network attached storage) that went bad. i pulled the 1 GB hard drive from inside of it so that i could get my files off of it. i was informed by seagate that it is formatted in linux and that i should try to use an ext3 reader to view the files and copy them off. i attached it to my motherboard of my windows 7 system via sata and i can see the drive, but no program can read or access the files, not even any ext2 or ext3 reader. i can see that there are 5 partitions, 4 of them in megabytes and one that is 930 GB's or so. i tried using linux mint 14 running from my dvd drive. it also saw the drive, but could not access it. so my next step, i am thinking, is to take an older computer of mine and load a linux operating system on it and then attach the hard drive via sata to the mother board as a second drive and see if i can access the files. my question is this, what free linux operating system should i use? or, does anyone have a better suggestion as to how to access these files on this hard drive? thanks, barry

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    Are you trying to copy files from the 1TB drive to some other medium? If you can see the the drive/partitions with Mint you should be able to copy anything from it to another medium. Did you mount the filesystem on the bad drive in Mint?

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    mint cannot access the drive. mint sees that there is a 1 TB drive, but cannot open it. i saw the partitions under drive management in windows and an ext3 reader in windows.

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    So are you saying when you run the 'fdisk -l' command from Mint, you only see the drive with no partitions?
    Do you see any partitions if you try gparted partition manager from Mint?
    How exactly are you trying to access/open the drive?

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    wow. i think that i really do not know how to access this drive using linux mint. the operating system is running from a dvd loaded in my windows 7 system. tell me how to do it if you would.

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    Well, you are started out ok. I presume the NAS is not a RAID (or if RAID, just mirrored)? If that is the case, then you need to mount the partition on an empty directory on the computer. Since you booted with a Live CD/DVD, you should have a directory /mnt. Create a sub-directory there, call it baddrive, with the command "mkdir /mnt/baddrive". Then mount the big partition there with the command: mount /dev/sdXN /mnt/baddrive
    /dev/sdXN would be the device and partition you want to mount, such as /dev/sda4. Any current Linux should be able to mount any ext2-based file system (which includes ext3 and ext4) without any muss. If it fails to mount, then you may need to try and recover the file system. To do that, run the command: fsck /dev/sdXN
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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    Just to follow up on my previous post to add to the post by Rubberman, you can click the Menu tab in the extreme lower left of the Desktop when you boot the Mint CD, and then look for 'terminal', click on it to open and type: sudo fdisk -l(Lower case Letter L in the command). Look at the output. You should be able to tell which drive it is unless you have a number of drives the same size? Use the same method to access gparted, open a terminal and type: sudo gparted.

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