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Hi guys, im new to the world of Linux however have been working with OSX for a while now so I have found a lot of similarities with Linux. Anyways ...
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    Question Ubuntu and AEGA Geforce graphics card


    Hi guys, im new to the world of Linux however have been working with OSX for a while now so I have found a lot of similarities with Linux. Anyways I have been setting up a media server with Ubuntu Server 13.04, I had to install a new graphics card with HDMI support and went for an EVGA Geforce 210 card which seems to work relatively well. However my TV which it is connected to is a 50" plasma and its only seeing it as a 32" screen. Ive also noticed that when connected to the box with my laptop the new screen is very laggy and slow and was to me it seems like a driver issue.

    I have followed some commands to purge the driver and install invidia driver from a repository through terminal, this did make a change to number of screen sizes I could select however the screen size still doesnt seem right and is still running quite slow when I am connected through VNC on my laptop.

    My question is would I be better trying a different distro as I want the best possible picture and sound quality for my media server and screen resolution is important for my movies.

    Many thanks

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    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Ok. Time for some "fun". The default nvidia driver for Linux is the open source nouveau driver. It has limitations. First, run the GUI x server configuration tool (system->preferences->X Server Configuration) - or something like that. You might be able to configure it to recognize the bigger aspect of the display. It (nouveau) also has performance issues. It is recommended that you install the proprietary nVidia driver. You are lucky in that Ubuntu has packages for those. They will deal with the gnarly stuff that I have to do manually for other enterprise linux distributions, such as blacklisting the nouveau driver. The driver I am currently using (recent) is 319.23. You may find that in the Synaptic package manager, or possibly a newer version.

    With the proprietary driver, you should get the performance you need, plus extras. I have an older (now 5 years old) 8800GT board and can run a full-screen HD video on each of my 2 24" 1920x1200 displays without problem (stuttering, etc). With nouveau, no such luck!
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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    Yeah this project has been a lot of "fun" lol. Okay so can I purge the driver again and install the proprietary driver? I did download the driver from the nvidia site but it just basically opened a text editor with tons of lines of code. However the other driver I installed through apt-get seemed to install fine but didnt improve performance. Is X Server Configuration I need to tweak then?

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    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    The file you get from nVidia is a shell script. Set the executable flag on it, and then run as a program. First, you need to blacklist the nouveau driver. So the steps are as follows:

    1. Boot into text mode (runlevel 3 on Red Hat systems) and login as root.
    2. Blacklist the nouveau driver by adding the following line to /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist.conf:

    blacklist nouveau

    3. Reboot into text-mode as root.
    4. Set the execute bit on the nvidia driver script: chmod +x filename
    5. Run the script and answer questions appropriately.

    With some newer systems I ran into a glitch in that the nouveau driver is linked directly into the kernel. When you run the nvidia script, this may be the case if it complains about another nvidia driver being loaded. If that happens, then you will have to reinstall the kernel with the nouveau driver blacklisted and redo #3 and #5.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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    Okay so this process is the same for ubuntu server? Do I just browse to the script through command line in text mode and execute the file once I have changed the flag with chmod? Once I have executed the script I then just reboot into normal mode? I thought the Nvidia driver and the Nouveau driver were separate drivers?

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    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    The nouveau driver is an open source nvidia driver, supported by the linux kernel community. It is still recognized by the nvidia driver installer script as an nvidia driver. In any case, don't edit the script, just chmod and execute it.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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    Okay so this nouveau driver is the one I downloaded from the Nvidea website? And this is the one that will hopefully get rid of my performance issues?

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    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nathan2oo3 View Post
    Okay so this nouveau driver is the one I downloaded from the Nvidea website? And this is the one that will hopefully get rid of my performance issues?
    No. The nouveau driver is the one that came installed with the system. The one you downloaded will replace it; however, there can only be one driver installed on the system for nvidia cards, which is why you have to blacklist the default (nouveau) driver.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    One final thing. You probably want to install the dkms module (dynamic kernel module services) before you install the nvidia driver. That way, when you update the kernel, the driver will be automatically reinstalled, otherwise when you update the kernel you will have to reinstall the nvidia driver, which is a PITA.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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    Ok cool thanks I will give that a try. How do I go about installing the dkms module?

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