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Ok, I'm looking for some power req for my equip. I have an HP a6707c PC with 4GB DDR2 RAM, Geforce 210 Graphics card with 1GB, 2.4GHz dual core Pentium. ...
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  1. #1
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    Power consumption?


    Ok, I'm looking for some power req for my equip. I have an HP a6707c PC with 4GB DDR2 RAM, Geforce 210 Graphics card with 1GB, 2.4GHz dual core Pentium. All stock except for HHD's, Gcard and Burners. I have a 250 watt power supply. My goal is to run 3 7200 rpm SATA HDD's with the Gcard and 1 burner. Do I have enough power?

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    There actually are websites where you can calculate if your psu (power supply unit) is powerful enough. Some of the other members here may be able to reccommend some sites. A basic web search should also find them.

    A 250 watt psu for a semi newerish desktop that is not a sff (small form factor) is INCREDIBLY weak. You're going to be cutting it very close. I would highly recommend getting a 400 watt or higher psu. Basic ones can be purchased for less than $30. If you plan on using the system for gaming, you will want a minimum of 500 watts.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jonathan63 View Post
    There actually are websites where you can calculate if your psu (power supply unit) is powerful enough. Some of the other members here may be able to reccommend some sites. A basic web search should also find them.

    A 250 watt psu for a semi newerish desktop that is not a sff (small form factor) is INCREDIBLY weak. You're going to be cutting it very close. I would highly recommend getting a 400 watt or higher psu. Basic ones can be purchased for less than $30. If you plan on using the system for gaming, you will want a minimum of 500 watts.
    Ok, thanks much. I did do a basic web search and got a bunch of BS. I did find a couple items though. I saw that my motherboard having a 2.4GHz dual core Pentium should use 65-80 watts and that DVD burners should use approx 10, but no more than 30. The burner thing was not a reliable source as far as I'm concerned though. Thanks. I'm gonna give it a shot and see if it will run like that. I do want gaming, but is on the back burner for the moment, I'm looking for OP speed now

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    I PM'd you the links because I'm not yet allowed to post URLs. I wouldn't trust any single site. I would use all and compare the results to give yourself a good idea. Also remember to give some "play room" in how much you need vs. how much you buy. In other words, if you need a 300W PSU, get a 450W PSU. That's one component that can really cause you heartache if you stress it out all the time. I cannot speak highly enough of a quality PSU. It is something that is so critical and will last you for YEARS. I've had my Thermaltake 850 for well over 5 years and several builds. I bought this when I built my E8400 right (core 2 duo CPU), and I use it now on my core i7 3770k. That's getting value out of your investment.

    By the way, why would you continue dumping money into this rig? DDR2-based systems went by the wayside many, many moons ago. I'm not trying to bust on your rig - just trying to point out that you're buying new wheels for a 78 Vega. It's not a good investment. You can get a modern board/cpu/RAM for under $200.

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    Maybe I can now:

    Here is one from Asus:
    ASUSTeK Computer Inc. -Support- Recommended Power Supply Wattage Calculator

    Here is one from NewEgg:
    Newegg.com - Recommended Power Supply Calculator.

    And this is the former Antec PSU calculator. I'm guessing this eXtreme PSU is a division/spinoff:
    eXtreme Power Supply Calculator

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    Quote Originally Posted by ultrapain View Post
    Maybe I can now:

    Here is one from Asus:
    ASUSTeK Computer Inc. -Support- Recommended Power Supply Wattage Calculator

    Here is one from NewEgg:
    Newegg.com - Recommended Power Supply Calculator.

    And this is the former Antec PSU calculator. I'm guessing this eXtreme PSU is a division/spinoff:
    eXtreme Power Supply Calculator
    Thanks for the links. . Much appreciated

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    Just make sure that the new power supply will fit in to your tower. There's only so much room in there. I haven't had a tower in years. The last one I had I kept for about 10 years total. It came with a 250W supply. I rebuilt it about 3 times in the years I had it; upgrading the MoBo, CPU, RAM and garphics several times and adding a newer / bigger second drive.

    But, on the last upgrade cycle I maxed it out at a 350W supply because that was the biggest thing I could physically shoehorn in to the tower. And it was *really* tight. I had to ditch the whole setup on the next upgrade cycle because the minimum graphics card I would have been happy with would have required a 450W supply and there was just no room in there for something that big.

    Get out a tape measure and see how much clearance you still have inside the case between the current PSU and the other components. On mine all my bays were full so I ended up moving the harddrives up and the DVD down to get enough clearance to put in the 350W PSU. But, a few years later even that did not leave enough room for the 450W PSU.

    Pull the specs on your current PSU and get its size and the specs on the new PSU and get its size and take your tape measure to your current set up to see if you have room for the new PSU.

    Also, make darn sure that you leave yourself a minimum of one 1/2 inch (and preferably 3/4-1 inch) of *EXTRA* clearance for the main wiring harness as it exits the PSU. If you have to bend that harness down too sharply where it exits the PSU's case to shove it in the tower you take the chance of breaking one of the wires inside the insulation and causing a short. Depending on which wire you break this can result in anything from wasting $30 on the upgrade to frying much of the hardware in your system.

    You'll also need to make sure that the min and max V/W outputs from the PSU are compatible with your current MoBo and chip. That is usually true so long as the number of pin connectors mach up. Most boards that run a dual core Pentium will use the 12 pin connector instead of the 16 pin connector and most PSUs with a 12 pin connector (or a 16 if that is what your board uses) *should* be compatible with the MoBo and CPU. Key word being *SHOULD*. But you need to make sure because it is still possible to get a PSU with the right number of connector pins that either will not push enough maximum V/W and will "brown out" your system or get one that is pushing too much on the minimum end and fry your system.

    You'll also need to calculate the overall maximum draw of your system and the *apparent* output of your PSU. Depending on what you get and how much you want to spend most non-enterprise class PSUs for towers are only about ~85-90% energy efficient. In other words it may be rated as 350 for spike consumption but only be able to sustain a 300W output for extended periods of time.

    And with more power draw / components you're looking at more heat in the tower. So if you have an open bay you may want to drop a big internal bay fan in it. Or upgrade the fans / sinks for your GPU / CPU and / or the fan on the back of the tower.

    If you need a new tower to make it work then you'll need to make sure that it will work with your current components; mainly your MoBo form factor.
    Last edited by Steven_G; 06-18-2013 at 01:50 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steven_G View Post
    Just make sure that the new power supply will fit in to your tower. There's only so much room in there. I haven't had a tower in years. The last one I had I kept for about 10 years total. It came with a 250W supply. I rebuilt it about 3 times in the years I had it; upgrading the MoBo, CPU, RAM and garphics several times and adding a newer / bigger second drive.

    But, on the last upgrade cycle I maxed it out at a 350W supply because that was the biggest thing I could physically shoehorn in to the tower. And it was *really* tight. I had to ditch the whole setup on the next upgrade cycle because the minimum graphics card I would have been happy with would have required a 450W supply and there was just no room in there for something that big.

    Get out a tape measure and see how much clearance you still have inside the case between the current PSU and the other components. On mine all my bays were full so I ended up moving the harddrives up and the DVD down to get enough clearance to put in the 350W PSU. But, a few years later even that did not leave enough room for the 450W PSU.

    Pull the specs on your current PSU and get its size and the specs on the new PSU and get its size and take your tape measure to your current set up to see if you have room for the new PSU.

    Also, make darn sure that you leave yourself a minimum of one 1/2 inch (and preferably 3/4-1 inch) of *EXTRA* clearance for the main wiring harness as it exits the PSU. If you have to bend that harness down too sharply where it exits the PSU's case to shove it in the tower you take the chance of breaking one of the wires inside the insulation and causing a short. Depending on which wire you break this can result in anything from wasting $30 on the upgrade to frying much of the hardware in your system.

    You'll also need to make sure that the min and max V/W outputs from the PSU are compatible with your current MoBo and chip. That is usually true so long as the number of pin connectors mach up. Most boards that run a dual core Pentium will use the 12 pin connector instead of the 16 pin connector and most PSUs with a 12 pin connector (or a 16 if that is what your board uses) *should* be compatible with the MoBo and CPU. Key word being *SHOULD*. But you need to make sure because it is still possible to get a PSU with the right number of connector pins that either will not push enough maximum V/W and will "brown out" your system or get one that is pushing too much on the minimum end and fry your system.

    You'll also need to calculate the overall maximum draw of your system and the *apparent* output of your PSU. Depending on what you get and how much you want to spend most non-enterprise class PSUs for towers are only about ~85-90% energy efficient. In other words it may be rated as 350 for spike consumption but only be able to sustain a 300W output for extended periods of time.

    And with more power draw / components you're looking at more heat in the tower. So if you have an open bay you may want to drop a big internal bay fan in it. Or upgrade the fans / sinks for your GPU / CPU and / or the fan on the back of the tower.

    If you need a new tower to make it work then you'll need to make sure that it will work with your current components; mainly your MoBo form factor.
    I'm not too worried about the "fitting part" honestly. As long as it will work. I have a "ghetto setup" as it is and can compromise visuals for performance. Hillbilly PC guy if you will.

  9. #9
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    You misunderstand. When I say fitting I don't mean style. I mean you can't shove a PSU that is 5.5 inches long, not counting the extra inch needed for the wiring harness to bend without causing a short (6.5 inches total length needed to "fit"), in to a tower where you only have 5 inches total space from the mount on the back of the tower to the back of the DVD player.

    Not only can the new PSU be too long to fit it can also be too wide, which will mean that the mounts won't line up correctly and it won't fit between the solid wall on the right side of the tower and the lip on the left side that forms the back corner of the tower that the detachable panel attaches to with "finger" screws.

    And, you can have a PSU that is too tall as well. Depending on the form factor of the tower and the MoBo and just exactly how much stuff you're trying to cram in there this can leave you with an unusable port on the MoBo that you can't put a card in to because the transitors / fans / etc on the top of the card won't clear the bottom of the PSU without bending or breaking.

    So, unless you've done like one of those setups where you built your "tower" out of leggos or something else equally ingenious then how much room you have to play with inside of a premanufactured / off the shelf tower is something that you need to be concerned about.

    And, if you're thinking of putting the PSU outside the tower you will need to find some kind of "extension cord" (which I don't know if they even make one?) because the wiring harness on a PSU is not all that long. It's designed to reach stuff from *inside* the tower.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steven_G View Post
    You misunderstand. When I say fitting I don't mean style. I mean you can't shove a PSU that is 5.5 inches long, not counting the extra inch needed for the wiring harness to bend without causing a short (6.5 inches total length needed to "fit"), in to a tower where you only have 5 inches total space from the mount on the back of the tower to the back of the DVD player.

    Not only can the new PSU be too long to fit it can also be too wide, which will mean that the mounts won't line up correctly and it won't fit between the solid wall on the right side of the tower and the lip on the left side that forms the back corner of the tower that the detachable panel attaches to with "finger" screws.

    And, you can have a PSU that is too tall as well. Depending on the form factor of the tower and the MoBo and just exactly how much stuff you're trying to cram in there this can leave you with an unusable port on the MoBo that you can't put a card in to because the transitors / fans / etc on the top of the card won't clear the bottom of the PSU without bending or breaking.

    So, unless you've done like one of those setups where you built your "tower" out of leggos or something else equally ingenious then how much room you have to play with inside of a premanufactured / off the shelf tower is something that you need to be concerned about.

    And, if you're thinking of putting the PSU outside the tower you will need to find some kind of "extension cord" (which I don't know if they even make one?) because the wiring harness on a PSU is not all that long. It's designed to reach stuff from *inside* the tower.
    LOL. I do understand. I'm good at "makeshift" setups even if it's a 3 piece tower. As long as the cables reach the Motherboard, I'm cool. . If it came down to it.

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