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Hello all. After searching in here and the web with no satisfying result(s), I'm writing basically to ask if anyone knows if it can be done. I was able to ...
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  1. #1
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    Multiple simultaneous desktops on a single monitor - Is it possible?


    Hello all.

    After searching in here and the web with no satisfying result(s), I'm writing basically to ask if anyone knows if it can be done.

    I was able to find only the following (full post here ):

    Quote Originally Posted by Adam Jaskiewicz
    @Jimmy, it depends on the WM. I used FVWM for a long time, and it allowed you to define a virtual desktop with multiple viewports. Windows would snap to the edges of viewports, but could overlap, and the actual view of the screen could also overlap viewports. – Adam Jaskiewicz Dec 9 '08 at 22:46
    The thing is that I mainly use Gnome or LXDE (or no advanced graphics desktop manager at all).

    There's also a rather creative answer here, but it's based on our somewhat "evil" nemesis created by Mr. Gates

    The issue is the following: I have an LCD TV and a monitor (the latter is not actually mine and will be returned in the next few weeks). I was thinking some minutes ago if it could be possible to use a single HW monitor (in this case the LCD widescreen) and have it split in several "virtual monitors" (2 or 4) instead of having to switch between them all the time.

    Main distros I usually use:
    - Ubuntu / Lubuntu
    - CentOS
    - Fedora
    - Debian
    - Kali Linux

    If it works on Ubuntu / Lubuntu it would be a major improvement since I use the other ones on Virtual Box most of the time for study purposes (even though some of them are actually installed on the hard drive itself as well).

    Otherwise, I would eventually buy two monitors if I have enough money. So, if that is the case, kindly point me out which hardware specs would my pc need regarding video and how to set it up.

    Thank you very much in advanced.

  2. #2
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    Multiple physical PCs on one monitor at one time? No, it's not possible. Just pick a distro or buy a KVM switch.

  3. #3
    Linux User IsaacKuo's Avatar
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    I think the question is about multiple workspaces on a single screen, split up into virtual sub-screens. I'm not sure what the exact benefit is supposed to be, compared to simply using smaller windows than fullscreen.

    Anyway, LXDE can be used with any WM (window manager). It defaults to OpenBox, but you can configure it to use any window manager. See here:

    http://wiki.lxde.org/en/LXDE:Questio...x_with_LXDE.3F

    Basically, a window manager is simply a program which manages the windows; it often includes something like a taskbar, and usually offers a way to organize them into virtual "workspaces". Every desktop environment uses a window manager as a component, but many window managers can run on their own. Not all desktop environments take nicely to using a different window manager than the default, though--the big DEs assume use of the default WM.

    But LXDE is okay with using a different WM than Openbox. You could use LXDE with the FVWM window manager instead of Openbox.

    Anyway, I'm confused by the reference to this link: c# - How do I utilize the functionality of a multi-monitor setup without physical hardware? - Stack Overflow

    That link basically is a wishful post on implementing Workspaces in a Windows OS. Workspaces have been a mainstay of Linux WMs and DEs for many years, but Windows still doesn't have it (and perhaps never will, given the annoying technical difficulties discussed on that page). LXDE already includes Workspaces functionality by default.

    Anyway, the original poster may find this discussion interesting:

    How do you divide a screen in Linux into frames that windows can expand to? ? jorgenmodin.net

    The author of this article seemed to be looking for the same thing, and decided the real solution to his desire might be a tiling window manager. You may find what you want by using LXDE with the xmonad window manager.
    ivotkl likes this.
    Isaac Kuo, ICQ 29055726 or Yahoo mechdan

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    Linux User IsaacKuo's Avatar
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    Actually, I have a better suggestion than a tiling window manager--try using a tabbed window manager. A tabbed window manager lets you overlap windows into a tabbed group; the title bar is split up to show tabs for each window.

    The feature which you'll probably like is the fact that you can drag a window from one title bar to another title bar. This makes it "snap" to the position and size of the destination window. That's a lot like dragging from one full screen to another full screen--the way it "snaps" to the dimensions of the destination screen.

    Fluxbox is a popular window manager with tabs. Basically, you use Ctrl+LeftMouseButton to drag a window into or out from a tab group. So, the first thing you do is open up some windows (maybe file manager windows) and move them side-by-side where you want your "virtual screens" to be. Then, whenever you open a new application, you ctrl-drag it to the window group you desire.

    To set this up with LXDE, follow these instructions:

    http://wiki.lxde.org/en/LXDE:Questio...x_with_LXDE.3F

    Edit /etc/xdg/lxsession/LXDE/desktop.conf with a text editor, and replace openbox-lxde with fluxbox.
    Isaac Kuo, ICQ 29055726 or Yahoo mechdan

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    Thank you Isaac for your post. I definitely use LXDE as the main window manager.

    In fact, what I'd like to do is split the screen into several virtual desktops. The benefits is that I can have, for example, a maximised window with some learning material and a terminal with the excercises on the other one. I don't have to manually re-arrange the windows when doing so. It would be time saving and would also look better IMHO.

  7. #6
    Linux User IsaacKuo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ivotkl View Post
    Thank you Isaac for your post. I definitely use LXDE as the main window manager.

    In fact, what I'd like to do is split the screen into several virtual desktops. The benefits is that I can have, for example, a maximised window with some learning material and a terminal with the excercises on the other one. I don't have to manually re-arrange the windows when doing so. It would be time saving and would also look better IMHO.
    I think you should check out my second suggestion--using fluxbox with LXDE. First, you edit /etc/xdg/lxsession/LXDE/desktop.conf, and replace openbox-lxde with fluxbox. Then, when you start an LXDE session it will use fluxbox instead of openbox.

    At this point, I suggest opening a couple dummy windows (they can be terminal windows) and resizing them side-by-side. These are now your "virtual screens". Instead of maximizing a window, you ctrl-drag it to the desired title bar. This is similar to the behavior in Windows 7 where you can drag a window to the top of a physical screen to maximize it to that screen. But with fluxbox, you can drag a windows to any window group to group it there. It will share the same size and position as the already established window.

    This saves a lot of time compared to manually moving and resizing the window to the desired position. Instead, you just ctrl-drag the window to the title bar of the destination window group.

    After getting used to dragging a window to the top of a physical screen to maximize it to that screen, I find this a lot faster and easier than dragging the window to the desired destination screen and then clicking on the maximize button.

    If you give this method of using fluxbox a try, I think you'll find ctrl-dragging a window to a window group to be faster than dragging the window to the desired screen and clicking the maximize button.
    Isaac Kuo, ICQ 29055726 or Yahoo mechdan

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