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Hello... My wife uses Windows Vista, as it's what on her PC and she works in IT for the county here, so she needs to stay up on Windows. Her ...
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  1. #1
    Linux User jkwilborn's Avatar
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    Mounting a Windows NTSF 'recover' partition on Linux


    Hello... My wife uses Windows Vista, as it's what on her PC and she works in IT for the county here, so she needs to stay up on Windows. Her Laptop is starting to show age, such as a broken Ethernet connector and some pixels out in her screen.

    The hard drive in her machine has a 'restore' that is used, well you know. I have a Pentium PC that I run Linux on and was going to try and load her windows on it. I can remove the drive and mount, all but the 'restore' partition on Linux. I am kind of lost as how to mount it so I can copy the data and put it on a partition on another drive.

    Has anyone tried something like this? I was hoping that I could move it to a desktop machine and at least get her up in a place better than the lounge chair in the living room where she isn't so distracted. And that her laptop is finally getting to the end of it's useful life.

    Any suggestions on how to proceed to get the partition usable? When I try, with the little that I know about mounting, it states that there is no mount point. I can see it in "gparted" but many of the options are grayed out.

    It comes up as sdd4 with the others as 1 - 3. I even tried using the sdd4 target and it says it doesn't exist...

    Thanks
    Jack

  2. #2
    Linux Engineer docbop's Avatar
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    A mount point is basically a directory (usually empty) remember Unix doesn't use drive letters instead it uses mount points. So you mount the drive to mount point. So just go to the root of you Linux box and create a directory like test, so you now have a /test to use as a mount point. Then use the mount command to mount the drive to the mount point, something like:

    Code:
     mount /dev/sdb1 /test
    For more info:

    mount(: mount filesystem - Linux man page

  3. #3
    Linux Guru
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    The hard drive in her machine has a 'restore' that is used,
    The restore option generally requires a 'Recovery CD' which usually is created during the installation of windows but not necessarily then. Do you not have a Recovery CD? Or maybe you just want to copy data off the windows disk? If that's the case, then the advice above as well as the link posted should do the job. I don't see how mounting the ntfs partition from Linux would help you install vista or if that's what you are trying to do?

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  5. #4
    Linux User jkwilborn's Avatar
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    I have tried to do this, I created a directory under /media then attempted to use the mount as "mount this here" as the way I remember it. The problem seems to be it can't find the drive I'm trying to mount. In other words there is not /dev/sdd4 as it shows when I use gparted to look at the partitions. There is nothing in the except in the right column that says "Restore", so there is no /dev/sdd4 to use as a device. Do you get what I mean?

    I am not restoring to a linux box, just trying to copy this partition to another drive with which I hope to install on a different computer, before the original dies permanently.

    Jack

  6. #5
    Linux Engineer docbop's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jkwilborn View Post
    I have tried to do this, I created a directory under /media then attempted to use the mount as "mount this here" as the way I remember it. The problem seems to be it can't find the drive I'm trying to mount. In other words there is not /dev/sdd4 as it shows when I use gparted to look at the partitions. There is nothing in the except in the right column that says "Restore", so there is no /dev/sdd4 to use as a device. Do you get what I mean?

    I am not restoring to a linux box, just trying to copy this partition to another drive with which I hope to install on a different computer, before the original dies permanently.

    Jack
    It won't be called sdd4 you have find the name of the device. That example I gave was my SSD backup drive is it /dev/sdb1

    You can use fdisk -l to see all the attacted drives the computer see mounted or not. Also I'm assuming your SSD is formated to a Linux format otherwise you have to tell mount what format it is.

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