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My old Toshiba Centrino laptop was showing its ago and I put an SSD into and made it my Kali box and the Toshiba is still a usable box now. ...
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  1. #11
    Linux Engineer docbop's Avatar
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    My old Toshiba Centrino laptop was showing its ago and I put an SSD into and made it my Kali box and the Toshiba is still a usable box now. With SSD prices dropping I got another one and use it from my backup drive on my main laptop, with rsync to an SSD backing up is now a quick job.

    SSD's are cool!

  2. #12
    Linux Engineer TNFrank's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by docbop View Post
    SSD's are cool!
    That's another good reason, Heat. SSD's run cooler and draw less power so your battery should last longer with an SSD then a standard HDD.

  3. #13
    Linux User sgosnell's Avatar
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    I agree that a 32GB SSD should be sufficient for any OS, as long as you don't plan to store hundreds of gigabytes of files. The OS should never fill it, until long after the SSD is obsolete. I do remember when a 10 megabyte HDD was big, and still have a couple of HDDs with capacities in the hundreds of megabytes. They've been collecting dust for a few years, but I haven't gotten around to tossing them. 32GB SSDs will certainly be too small for an operating system at some time in the future, but that won't be this year, or the next, or...

    SSDs, as pointed out, are faster, more stable, and use less power than HDDs. Currently, the only reason I know of to use a spinning magnetic HDD is when you need to store large amounts of data cheaply.

  4. #14
    Linux Engineer TNFrank's Avatar
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    I have several web sites bookmarked as to how to set up an SSD for Linux BUT if someone could, can you give me a "Reader's Digest" version of what I need to do to make sure it'll work as well as possible. Thanks.

    Also, yep, 32GB should be plenty. My old iMac had a 40GB HDD(actually 60GB but the motherboard would only "see" 40GB) and even with pics, videos and other stuff I didn't fill up anywhere close to half of it.
    Something else I need to ask about the Swap Partition, does it always have to be the same size as the Ext4 Partition or can I resize it down to less?

  5. #15
    Linux Guru rokytnji's Avatar
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    Something else I need to ask about the Swap Partition, does it always have to be the same size as the Ext4 Partition or can I resize it down to less?
    Same size as the ext4 partition?
    Whatcha talking about Willis?

    Just make it manually (1gig) with custom install and point the installer accordingly. to /.
    Grub goes on MBR.

    Posted from my

    Code:
      *-disk
                 description: ATA Disk
                 product: KingSpec KSD-ZF1
                 physical id: 0.0.0
                 bus info: scsi@0:0.0.0
                 logical name: /dev/sda
                 version: 2012
                 serial: ZF18613012400045
                 size: 58GiB (63GB)
    I thought we learned you better than that.
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  6. #16
    Linux User sgosnell's Avatar
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    Swap can be any size you like, including zero. You don't have to have a swap partition. You can use a swap file, or nothing at all. It all depends on your usage, and how much you think you need. I've never heard of having a swap size the same size as your rootfs. Maybe the same size as your RAM, but that's not set in stone, either. The purpose of swap is to allow swapping data from RAM to disk as necessary, as your RAM gets filled by data and you need more RAM. Having a reasonable amount of RAM, say 4GB, can reduce your swap usage to almost zero. I have 4GB installed, and I almost never use any swap at all, although I do have a ~1GB swap partition. I've never needed more, but I don't do much video or music editing. YMMV somewhat.

  7. #17
    Linux Engineer TNFrank's Avatar
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    I have 2GB of RAM and I never use Swap either. Also, it seems that automatically a Linux install with make Swap the same size as the extended install partition. Just look at the pics I posted where it shows my hard drive, you see that the Swap is identical to the extended install partition. Any reason why that is?
    I ordered a 2.5" enclosure so I'll use my 320GB HDD as an extra external hard drive and put the 120GB into my #2 which should be plenty large enough. Then I'll just hang onto the 80GB for a spare.

  8. #18
    Linux User sgosnell's Avatar
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    Most installation setups make an extended partition for swap, mostly, I think, because the number of primary partitions allowed is small. You can put many logical partitions into an extended partition, so they set that up for you. Usually the logical swap partition is the same size as the extended partition to avoid wasting drive space unnecessarily. You can easily change the size of the extended partition, or the logical partitions inside, with gparted. Perhaps you meant to refer to this above, where we took your reference to be to the entire root filesystem. You can change the way swap is set up if you want, by using a primary partition instead of the extended, by using a swapfile instead of a partition, or by having no swap at all. Linux is very configurable this way. The easiest thing is to just use whatever the installer set up, but perhaps tweak the size. if it's giving you a swap of 8GB, then it really needs to be reduced. You can make the logical swap partition smaller, then make the extended partition smaller, or you can just nuke them both, your choice. No need to worry about data on a swap partition, or to format it, it's just fallow ground for putting memory contents into. I tend to use a primary partition for swap, because it's easier to deal with. I don't often need more primary partitions on a drive than the system allows, so there is no need for an extended partition. That would probably be the case on your 32GB SSD. You probably won't need 5 partitions.

  9. #19
    Linux Guru rokytnji's Avatar
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    To add to what what was said above.
    I just run my ssd on my 2gig ram atom netbook with just 2 partitions. Root "/" and Home "/home
    I use no swap on it.

    I run AntiX on it though which is way lighter than Kali on using ram and processes running.
    Around a 8 second boot to slim before login. 11 seconds total to a 54MB ram at idle/static Icewm Desktop.
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  10. #20
    Linux Engineer TNFrank's Avatar
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    So am I going to have to set aside 10% as unallocated so the SSD doesn't fill up and get slow? What about doing this:
    # Move the user cache to RAM
    tmpfs /home/USERNAME/.cache tmpfs defaults,noatime,nosuid 0 0
    and how about this:
    Don’t forget to add noatime to /etc/fstab for each SSD you have a Linux install/filesystem on to limit writes.
    Anything else that I need to do to make the SSD live longer and run faster?
    How to maintain and properly setup an SSD in Linux (with some general extra speed tweaks) - Overclock.net Community
    How to maximise SSD performance with Linux - APC

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