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I ask this question, because the only drivers available through my searches for one are for Windows. However, it is a piece of hardware, and it reads four different types ...
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    How Can I Get A Teac Muilti Card Reader To Be Readable By Linux?


    I ask this question, because the only drivers available through my searches for one are for Windows. However, it is a piece of hardware, and it reads four different types of memory cards, or I should say, it SHOULD read four different types of memory cards. It worked while I was using Windows XP Pro, but I didn't dare keep using that OS, so now all of my computers are Linux Mint Mate 16.

    It seems like there should be a way to get those card readers functioning on Linux Mint, but I haven't been able to figure it out. The strange thing is that the system can see the reader/s, but when I try to mount them, it just gives me an error message that the application necessary to mount them is unknown.

    Is this a lost cause, or is there something that can work with this card reader. This is a plea to any expert out there that might have ideas in this area. Thanks.

    I tried to figure out how to transfer this thread from the Linux Mint Forum, to this one, but couldn't. Sorry.

  2. #2
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    This is the proper forum for your question.

    How is the reader attached to the computer - usb, or something else? Usually, the OS will detect the cards in the reader as disc drives, which should show up in /dev, such as /dev/sdx, /dev/sdy, etc. So, stick a memory card into one of the ports on the device, and see if it shows up in /dev. If it does, then you are ready to mount it, if it isn't already in /media. You can also use the df or mount command (with no arguments) to see if the system has detected and auto-mounted the card.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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    It is mounted into the case. It was taken out of a Dell Desktop. The guy that built it for me got it from one of his sources when I asked about a possible multi-card reader.

    It does show up in /dev as /dev/sda, /dev/sda1, /dev/sda2, /dev/sda5, /dev/sdb, /dev/sdc, /dev/sdd, and /dev/sde. I'm thinking it's the last four, as each card insert slot is showing up as a disk in the Computer. I say it shows in /dev, but that may not be exactly the case, as the card's contents are still unobtainable.

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    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Ok. As either root or sudo, post the output of "fdisk -l /dev/sd[bcde]" here, as well as the output of the "mount" and "df" commands (no options required. Make sure you have put a card in each slot first. Also, look in /media for any sub-directories that the auto-mounter may have created. If these are not partitioned cards, we can try mounting them after we look at the media via fdisk above.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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    The results were nothing. It just asked for my password, and then returned immediately to the command line. I tried it three times to be sure.

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    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    I assume you are the admin user for this system? If so, then you should have sudo privileges. So, try this: sudo su -
    After inputting your password (you do remember it don't you?), you should end up with a # prompt. If still $ then it isn't accepting either your user id or password for sudo. If you do get the # prompt, then try "fdisk -l" with no other arguments.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rubberman View Post
    I assume you are the admin user for this system? If so, then you should have sudo privileges. So, try this: sudo su -
    After inputting your password (you do remember it don't you?), you should end up with a # prompt. If still $ then it isn't accepting either your user id or password for sudo. If you do get the # prompt, then try "fdisk -l" with no other arguments.
    That did it, and I'm not sure why I didn't think of trying it. Don't have to do it much. Results:

    Code:
    Disk /dev/sda: 320.1 GB, 320072933376 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 38913 cylinders, total 625142448 sectors
    Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
    Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x00087fee
    
       Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
    /dev/sda1   *        2048   605468671   302733312   83  Linux
    /dev/sda2       605470718   625141759     9835521    5  Extended
    /dev/sda5       605470720   625141759     9835520   82  Linux swap / Solaris

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    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Ok. It doesn't show /dev/sdb-e. Are there cards in the reader's slots?
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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    Yeah, it was in the HS-SD slot when I ran that command. Here's what puzzles me, though, when I run
    Code:
    sg_scan -i
    it shows all of them.

    Code:
    /dev/sg0: scsi0 channel=0 id=0 lun=0 [em]
        HL-DT-ST  DVD-RAM GSA-H40L  SX03 [rmb=1 cmdq=0 pqual=0 pdev=0x5] 
    /dev/sg1: scsi2 channel=0 id=0 lun=0 [em]
        ATA       WDC WD3200AAJS-2  01.0 [rmb=0 cmdq=0 pqual=0 pdev=0x0] 
    /dev/sg2: scsi4 channel=0 id=0 lun=0 [em]
        TEAC      USB   HS-CF Card  4.00 [rmb=1 cmdq=0 pqual=0 pdev=0x0] 
    /dev/sg3: scsi4 channel=0 id=0 lun=1 [em]
        TEAC      USB   HS-xD/SM    4.00 [rmb=1 cmdq=0 pqual=0 pdev=0x0] 
    /dev/sg4: scsi4 channel=0 id=0 lun=2 [em]
        TEAC      USB   HS-MS Card  4.00 [rmb=1 cmdq=0 pqual=0 pdev=0x0] 
    /dev/sg5: scsi4 channel=0 id=0 lun=3 [em]
        TEAC      USB   HS-SD Card  4.00 [rmb=1 cmdq=0 pqual=0 pdev=0x0]
    And when I run
    Code:
    sudo sg_map
    it shows all of them as well.

    Code:
    /dev/sg0  /dev/sr0
    /dev/sg1  /dev/sda
    /dev/sg2  /dev/sdb
    /dev/sg3  /dev/sdc
    /dev/sg4  /dev/sdd
    /dev/sg5  /dev/sde
    I got those commands from Google searches, and even found a page specifically on how to set up USB, and Multi-Card Readers. So far I haven't figured out why what is suggested doesn't seem to work for my situation. I'm thinking it's /dev/sda through sdd that are the multi-cards. It looks to me that /dev/sde is the SWAP partition. I don't know any of this for sure, though.

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    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Most of these chips are formatted with the FAT-16 or FAT-32 file systems (depending upon size). Create the following directories (as root): mkdir /mnt/sdb /mnt/sdc /mnt/sdd /mnt/sde

    Next try to mount each device in turn:
    Code:
    mount /dev/sdb /mnt/sdb
    mount /dev/sdc /mnt/sdc
    mount /dev/sdd /mnt/sdd
    mount /dev/sde /mnt/sde
    Post the error output here. If any mounted without errors, then you should be able to use the "ls" command to look inside the directory in /mnt. Do note, if these all fail, then you can also add the option "-t vfat" in the code above before the /dev/sdx argument and try again. That tells mount that you expect the file system to be some version of FAT, such as FAT-16 or FAT-32. Mount will figure it out.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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