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Hi, I have two Raid0 drives (yes I know it should have been RAID5) that was located in a NAS server until its LAN port died. I wan't to install ...
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  1. #1
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    Moving Raid drives


    Hi,

    I have two Raid0 drives (yes I know it should have been RAID5) that was located in a NAS server until its LAN port died. I wan't to install them in an Ubuntu computer but don't know the exact commands for assembling the two disks together again and mount them. I'm quit afraid of damaging the contents on the disks although I know they are fully functional (500Gb each, ext3).

  2. #2
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    Software raid, Hardware Raid, etc

    If they ate software raided, is the machine that you plan to use also software raided?
    Last edited by alf55; 06-28-2014 at 03:06 AM. Reason: Added questiion.

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    Linux Engineer docbop's Avatar
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    I'm with you I'd be nervous too.

    I would back them up first. No way to install a NIC in the NAS box and transfer the data to another server? Was OS is the NAS running?
    A lion does not lose sleep, over the opinion of sheep.

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    The NAS I'm moving from have normal SATA connections with a PowerPC system (TS-201) on. I would guess it's a software RAID since you can switch between RAID and normal stand alone disks in the user interface. Since the LAN port is dead it's no way to back it up which is the reason why I wan't to move them to a computer.

    The computer I move it to have a normal IDE SATA disk with Ubuntu and Win7 on it and place for the two RAID disks.

    Given that it's a software RAID0, which Linux commands do I use to assemble them again and mount them in order to make a backup?

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    Linux Engineer docbop's Avatar
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    The RAID software on the NAS box would have to be the the same and even then sometime moving RAID disks from one system to another can be very tricky. RAID concepts are standard, but implementations aren't so the one RAID might not handle disks from another RAID.

    I know your LAN port is dead, but NIC cards are very cheap and if you could get one installed in the NAS system you could get the data off the NAS box. Problem you haven't given any info about the NAS system is it a computer running NAS and RAID software, or is it a dedicated NAS device that you just plug into. Any idea what OS the NAS device/computer is running.
    A lion does not lose sleep, over the opinion of sheep.

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    There is no place to install a NIC in the QNAP TS-201, the port is soldered directly on the main card.

    I guess there is no danger in trying

    Code:
    mdadm --query
    or even

    Code:
    mdadm --assemble --scan
    Could I hurt the array just by installing it into a computer and start it up?

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    Linux Engineer docbop's Avatar
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    At this point you don't have a lot of options. Looking at the box it's a dedicated NAS box, not PCI slots so can't put another NIC in. Doesn't say what its using for OS. I'm used to hardware RAID so nice to work at the controler level to check things out.

    It's all risky is your going to have to put the drives in another computer and see if it recognizes them and what does it recognize them as. Then have to install RAID software if not already installed, and see if the RAID utilities recognize then as RAID drives, as being part of an existing RAID set. Then a chicken and egg secnario you have to member drives of a RAID set that doesn't exist. NOW is where I get nervous will it let you create a RAID set and make these two drives the members. Will it accept the config info and striping without trying to write its own config info.

    At this point you better wait for someone more familiar with Linux software RAID to help. I've built Linux software RAID from scratch, but haven't dealt with it at a low level.
    A lion does not lose sleep, over the opinion of sheep.

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    The reason I asked about id the machine that is to hold the drives is using software raid, the drives may be attempting to use the same "mdX" devices. I have successfully recovered data from a single software raid1 drive (keeping the other safe) which was put another system that had software raid1. I had to do the work remotely and I have some notes. If the "new host" does not have software raid in use, it is a lot less pis and needles as all you need to do using mdadmin is:
    There was a good articale in Linux Journal Recovery of RAID and LVM2 Volumes | Linux Journal on the second page they are doing the raid recovery.

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    Linux Engineer docbop's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alf55 View Post
    The reason I asked about id the machine that is to hold the drives is using software raid, the drives may be attempting to use the same "mdX" devices. I have successfully recovered data from a single software raid1 drive (keeping the other safe) which was put another system that had software raid1. I had to do the work remotely and I have some notes. If the "new host" does not have software raid in use, it is a lot less pis and needles as all you need to do using mdadmin is:
    There was a good articale in Linux Journal Recovery of RAID and LVM2 Volumes | Linux Journal on the second page they are doing the raid recovery.
    RAID 1 is mirrored drives so there is no striping/parity involved, it's just a second drive that they delay the writes to.

    The article is interesting but they are working with drives they knew came from the same software system. Your NAS box we are assuming is barebones Linux, but FreeBSD is used a lot for NAS. I think this is headed towards your only option is to put a disk in the Linux system and see how Linux views it. Does the Linux RAID software see the drive as a member of a RAID set. But I come from a background of things being time critical to repair so you take chances and either win big or lose big having to rebuild and restore data from backup.
    A lion does not lose sleep, over the opinion of sheep.

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    Quote Originally Posted by docbop View Post
    ... so you take chances and either win big or lose big having to rebuild and restore data from backup.
    That's so true...

    Ubuntu sees the disk as RAID members but not the array it seems like:

    Code:
    ****@ubuntu:~$ sudo mdadm --examine --scan /dev/sda1 /dev/sda2 /dev/sda3 /dev/sda4 /dev/sdb1 /dev/sdb2 /dev/sdb3 /dev/sdb4
    
    ****@ubuntu:~$ sudo sfdisk -l /dev/sda
    Disk /dev/sda: 60801 cylinders, 255 heads, 63 sectors/track
    Units = cylinders of 8225280 bytes, blocks of 1024 bytes, counting from 0
    
       Device Boot Start     End   #cyls    #blocks   Id  System
    /dev/sda1   *      0+     65      66-    530113+  83  Linux
    /dev/sda2         66     131      66     530145   82  Linux swap / Solaris
    /dev/sda3        132   60790   60659  487243417+  83  Linux
    /dev/sda4      60791   60799       9      72292+  83  Linux
    
    ****@ubuntu:~$ sudo sfdisk -l /dev/sdb
    Disk /dev/sdb: 60801 cylinders, 255 heads, 63 sectors/track
    Units = cylinders of 8225280 bytes, blocks of 1024 bytes, counting from 0
    
       Device Boot Start     End   #cyls    #blocks   Id  System
    /dev/sdb1   *      0+     65      66-    530113+  83  Linux
    /dev/sdb2         66     131      66     530145   82  Linux swap / Solaris
    /dev/sdb3        132   60790   60659  487243417+  83  Linux
    /dev/sdb4      60791   60799       9      72292+  83  Linux
    
    ****@ubuntu:~$ sudo blkid
    /dev/loop0: UUID="4854a120-ce63-43e6-a043-ff2f947f9c5f" TYPE="ext4" 
    /dev/sda1: UUID="3c2a691d-b918-59ed-8f17-3406692073e6" TYPE="linux_raid_member" 
    /dev/sda2: UUID="9b0cfb3c-1175-538a-0278-87ad7b90d3fd" TYPE="linux_raid_member" 
    /dev/sda3: UUID="627d8106-8d82-d5d5-2b13-8b4b562abb00" TYPE="linux_raid_member" 
    /dev/sda4: UUID="f70f29d9-e904-8df1-f168-2a01f63a9588" TYPE="linux_raid_member" 
    /dev/sdb1: UUID="3c2a691d-b918-59ed-8f17-3406692073e6" TYPE="linux_raid_member" 
    /dev/sdb2: UUID="9b0cfb3c-1175-538a-0278-87ad7b90d3fd" TYPE="linux_raid_member" 
    /dev/sdb3: UUID="627d8106-8d82-d5d5-2b13-8b4b562abb00" TYPE="linux_raid_member" 
    /dev/sdb4: UUID="f70f29d9-e904-8df1-f168-2a01f63a9588" TYPE="linux_raid_member" 
    /dev/sdc1: UUID="F2BE9BF2BE9BAD9B" TYPE="ntfs"
    Where the sdc1 is the disk I run Ubuntu on

    As you can se the --examine does not return anything which I guess is because there is no superblock mdadm can use.

    Should I try --assemble?

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