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I have a CD-ROM that was working a couple days ago on RH7.3. I installed a CD-R as secondary slave (to the CD-ROM) and after reading plenty of HOW-TOs, I ...
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  1. #1
    Linux Newbie deek's Avatar
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    ATAPI/IDE CD-ROM Question...


    I have a CD-ROM that was working a couple days ago on RH7.3. I installed a CD-R as secondary slave (to the CD-ROM) and after reading plenty of HOW-TOs, I finally got it to work, seemingly setting it up in SCSI emulation.

    Now, my CD-ROM doesn't work. It is recognized by my BIOS, but I am getting an "hdc no response" status when booting (in GRUB).

    Is there anything wrong with the actual hardware seeing it is recognized by my BIOS? Did I just turn on some settings or incompletely set something up to get the "no response" error?

    If it is not a hardware problem, I will certainly feel more comfortable, just have to put some more time and effort into getting my configuration correct.

    Thanks!
    Dan

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    Try setting the DMA mode, manually, to the lowest common denominator in the BIOS, probably DMA mode 1 or 2.
    Michael Salivar

    Man knows himself insofar as he knows the world, becoming aware of it only in himself, and of himself only within it.
    --Goethe

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    I booted from my floppy that I made during the RH7.3 install, and without changing a thing, both drives were detected and functional. But without the boot disk, just booting from my system, I continue to get the error.

    Another thing I have noticed is that I can no longer boot from my CD, only the floppy...

    I apparently did something when I was following several different SCSI Emulation directions, but I don't know what, and now something isn't right. What all is on a boot disk?

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    Hrm, the fact that you can't boot to CD... that's not software, so you need to fix that problem before even touching your linux install. If you remove the new drive can you boot to CD? Maybe a stupid question, but it's properly enabled in the BIOS for the optical drive you're trying to boot with?

    Sometimes two drives simply don't get along on a channel. For example, I just upgraded an Acer 12x8x32 to a Plextor 52x24x52, and now my old IBM Deskstar 8 isn't present on a cold boot, but on a reboot it's there just fine. So try swapping things around on the channels. I know it probably won't be optimal speed wise, but it might shed some light on the situation.
    Michael Salivar

    Man knows himself insofar as he knows the world, becoming aware of it only in himself, and of himself only within it.
    --Goethe

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    Thanks for that lead, Ethyriel. I did just that.

    First, I took the new CD-R out (actually, just unplugged it from the power supply) and the CD-ROM worked just fine. And vice versa, although without the SCSI Emulation, I couldn't burn a thing.

    So, each of them work individually, but together, much like you said, must not get along on the same channel. I then changed the jumpers on both to Cable Select, and that messed up everything, as neither drive worked and linux acted really weird. So, then I put them back as master and slave (jumper-wise), but switched the CD-R to primary and CD-ROM to slave...and eureka, all worked well, except for I couldn't burn anything in RH 7.3 without SCSI emulation.

    I decided to dump RH7.3 and find a newer distro. I picked up SUSE 9.2, as I could do an FTP install and not fuss with burning more discs. It installed without a problem and all my hardware works perfectly. SUSE 9.2 is very windows-like, especially with KDE 3.3. Which, makes me feel a lot more familiar. I don't have to mount any drives anymore, it has hotplugging available (moreso the updated kernel, I would assume). So, needless to say, I am really happy with SUSE!!! And everything works without me having to do anything but install the software...pretty slick!!! Much better than RH7.3 in my opinion...but now I am rambling:)

    Anyways, thanks for the suggestions. I got everything working and even though I don't know the cause of the problems, they are no longer there!

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    Lord, I would hope that Suse 9.2 is smoother than RedHat 7.3; it has a few years on it

    I really like Suse 9.2 as well, when I'm in the mood for a slick and well-integrated desktop experience (Mandrake 10.1 Official is quite nice too). I also, however, like the "get your hands dirty" Slackware and Debian approach...to each his own Some of us are distro-sluts.
    There are two major products that come out of Berkeley: LSD and UNIX. We don't believe this to be a coincidence.

    - Jeremy S. Anderson

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    Yeah, so far, SUSE is my number one, but realize, that I have only had experience with that and a couple versions of Red Hat, with 7.3 the newest one I have ever used.

    I almost went with Mandrake for this latest build, but I really liked the FTP install that SUSE had.

    I have been looking around to Debian and Slackware, but I don't think I am quite ready for those yet...still have a ton of learning curve to catch up with.

    I did grab Knoppix 3.7, but it doesn't appear to want to work on this system. I might try it on my main system at home (windows 2000), seeing it is all on CD...who knows.

    I might turn into a distro-slut too:)

    All I know, is this whole linux revolution (of which I realize I am hopping on the band-wagon later than most), has really brought the fun and excitement back into computing for me at home. I am not a gamer like I once was, but now with linux, I am just having a lot of fun with computers again!

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    I am just having a lot of fun with computers again!
    Amen brother!
    There are two major products that come out of Berkeley: LSD and UNIX. We don't believe this to be a coincidence.

    - Jeremy S. Anderson

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    All I know, is this whole linux revolution (of which I realize I am hopping on the band-wagon later than most)
    Hopefully that won't be the case for long

    It's good to see you got it working, but it's too bad you had to dump your install. It's always tough to suggest someone get a newer distribution, maybe that's why I like distros like Debian and Arch with their rolling currents.
    Michael Salivar

    Man knows himself insofar as he knows the world, becoming aware of it only in himself, and of himself only within it.
    --Goethe

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