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I'm running Suse 9.2, and I want to install Xen. I realize I need to create a new partition for Xen. MY question is as follows: I have a second ...
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  1. #1
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    Partitioning...


    I'm running Suse 9.2, and I want to install Xen. I realize I need to create a new partition for Xen. MY question is as follows: I have a second hard drive (NTFS) that has data from my old windows system. I would like to install Xen to this drive, rather than my first hard drive to which I installed Linux. Can I install Xen to a drive other than the one my Linux is installed to? Also, my second drive (the one I want Xen installed to) is 80GB (like 45% unused)m so can I create a new partition without risking losing my old data? Thanks in advance. +jrob

  2. #2
    Linux Guru anomie's Avatar
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    I have a second hard drive (NTFS) that has data from my old windows system. I would like to install Xen to this drive, rather than my first hard drive to which I installed Linux. Can I install Xen to a drive other than the one my Linux is installed to?
    Yes.

    Also, my second drive (the one I want Xen installed to) is 80GB (like 45% unused)m so can I create a new partition without risking losing my old data?
    You mean you want to resize the NTFS partition and create a new partition? IMO, resizing partitions is not risk-free. I would back up your important data first.

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    Thanks. And yes, i want to keep my existing data on one partition and create a new partition for Xen. Being a newb, i'm forced to ask... how do i do a backup in Linux?

  4. #4
    Linux Guru anomie's Avatar
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    How about using K3B to write a tarball to a cd / dvd?

    If you'd like to back up your /home/user-name-here/ directory, for example:
    Code:
    tar cvfp user-backup.tar /home/user-name-here/
    The p option will let you preserve permissions if you'd like. Then burn user-backup.tar to the cd. (Note: this example only applies if you're trying to back up your user's home directory. I don't know where your important files live.)

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