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Originally Posted by techieMoe It's not worth the work. Just my 2 cents. I feel the same as techieMoe. It's unlikely that you'll see enough improvement to make it worth ...
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  1. #11
    oz
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    Quote Originally Posted by techieMoe
    It's not worth the work. Just my 2 cents.
    I feel the same as techieMoe. It's unlikely that you'll see enough improvement to make it worth the risk of ruining a piece of hardware.

  2. #12
    Linux User George Harrison's Avatar
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    Hmm.. ok thanks guys. So the overclocking does leave permanent damage if you don't know what you're doing and go from 115mhz to 500mhz or something, you can't just go back and underclock it - what's done has been done and you've destroyed you hardware.. this has kind of made me wake up a bit. I still feel that the RedStorm did a great job and is entirely safe to use considering it will not auto raise you anything higher than what it feels it safe. I might do a little bit more tweaking, 10mhz here and there over a long period of time and see what happens.

    One question: If someone did overclock to say a 3200 or a 3500 speed would that count as a 64 bit processor? Is it just virtually a 3200 or is it really a 3200 64? Could you run a 64 bit OS on it?

    One other amusing thing is that I'm building a new box for my friend and his mother would kill him if he kept his old box to mess around with for clutter reasons she claims. I was thinking about going over to his house and just overclocking the thing to death until it fried itself out and then take it out to the desert (lots of desert in Nevada) and shoot it with a pistol or something may seem harsh but this computer caused my friend so much hell it's hard to imagine. It's an Athlon Duron, 180MB of RAM, old old Nvidia card, etc. It's a Compaq Presario. The only thing that worries me is that since it's a prebuilt Compaq like that, for safety reasons, the FSB probably isn't there to bump up. We'll see what happens.

    EDIT: techieMoe, I do see what you're trying to say about there's no reason to overclock today's processors but what about that Athlon 1000 I have? I think it would be pretty fun and useful. I can't hurt too much considering my dad underclocked it from the shipped proc.
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  3. #13
    Linux Engineer LondoJowo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by George Harrison
    Hmm.. ok thanks guys. So the overclocking does leave permanent damage if you don't know what you're doing and go from 115mhz to 500mhz or something, you can't just go back and underclock it - what's done has been done and you've destroyed you hardware.
    As long as you're not too aggressive you won't destroy your hardware. I have been overclocking my systems since the late 90's and only had one motherboard fail and it was due to the manufacturer putting a sticker on the southbridge chip, end result the floppy drive couldn't be accessed. I had a 1.6Ghz P4 overclocked to 2.4Ghz and it ran perfectly for over 1 1/2 years before I sold it.

    This forum cracks me up, on one hand they preach on the evils of MS charging for their OS and then recommend against getting additional performance out of processor for free.

  4. #14
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    I used to OC a few components now and then, but not anymore. There is one rule that always holds true for overclockers, however:

    Don't worry... your computer will always let you know if it doesn't like what you are doing to it.

  5. #15
    Linux User George Harrison's Avatar
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    I went into the BIOS and there wasn't a fsb option per se but a "CPU Clock" that was shipped with 166mhz but bumped to 180mhz using RedStorm (I think this number is the host), I bumped this to 190mhz and the computer lagged a bit to the hardware detection and it finally flashed up "Athlon 2600+" grr.. I went to investigate and it seems as though the bios has now locked me out of modding the CPU Clock and had a grayed out 166mhz in it but it still let me using RedStorm to get it back to 180mhz and thus a 2700. I have done my fair share of Googling and Athlon's like mine can run the CPU clock at a maximum of 400mhz, thus making it a 3200+. Am I even raising this correctly? It only says "CPU Clock". Maybe I should just stop messing with stuff that I shouldn't be messing around with..
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    Linux Engineer LondoJowo's Avatar
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    I just read up on RedStorm, it automatically raises the FSB and tests until it hits the highest stable overclock. I suspect that your ram is what's holding it back as it's probably PC2700 speed which is 166Mhz stock. So you're able to get 180Mhz.

  7. #17
    Linux User George Harrison's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LondoJowo
    I just read up on RedStorm, it automatically raises the FSB and tests until it hits the highest stable overclock. I suspect that your ram is what's holding it back as it's probably PC2700 speed which is 166Mhz stock. So you're able to get 180Mhz.
    You're exactly right.

    I was in the bios playing with the cpu clock, and I noticed something after about 10 minutes of constant rebooting: this isn't going to work. RedStorm ups it to (what it says) 180mhz but the cpu clock says 175mhz making this a 2700+ now. When I raise it to 180mhz on the cpu clock it will say it's a 2800+ I was giddy when it said this but FreeBSD refused to boot, as did XP. I went back and let RedStorm do it's thing again. I'm content with the 2700+ right now and at least it works. Thanks for the advice on RAM, I'll have to pick some up when I get some cash. The PC3200 you run I found on newegg I think - it's only $90 which is resonable. If I can get this thing to a 3200+ for bragging rights then it's worth the cash.
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  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by George Harrison
    Hmm.. ok thanks guys. So the overclocking does leave permanent damage if you don't know what you're doing and go from 115mhz to 500mhz or something, you can't just go back and underclock it - what's done has been done and you've destroyed you hardware.. this has kind of made me wake up a bit. I still feel that the RedStorm did a great job and is entirely safe to use considering it will not auto raise you anything higher than what it feels it safe. I might do a little bit more tweaking, 10mhz here and there over a long period of time and see what happens.

    One question: If someone did overclock to say a 3200 or a 3500 speed would that count as a 64 bit processor? Is it just virtually a 3200 or is it really a 3200 64? Could you run a 64 bit OS on it?

    One other amusing thing is that I'm building a new box for my friend and his mother would kill him if he kept his old box to mess around with for clutter reasons she claims. I was thinking about going over to his house and just overclocking the thing to death until it fried itself out and then take it out to the desert (lots of desert in Nevada) and shoot it with a pistol or something may seem harsh but this computer caused my friend so much hell it's hard to imagine. It's an Athlon Duron, 180MB of RAM, old old Nvidia card, etc. It's a Compaq Presario. The only thing that worries me is that since it's a prebuilt Compaq like that, for safety reasons, the FSB probably isn't there to bump up. We'll see what happens.

    EDIT: techieMoe, I do see what you're trying to say about there's no reason to overclock today's processors but what about that Athlon 1000 I have? I think it would be pretty fun and useful. I can't hurt too much considering my dad underclocked it from the shipped proc.
    It still wont be as fast as the AMD 64. The AMD 64 3200+ will out beat a AMD 3200 by a BIG %. Also no a AMD K7 3200 is not 64 its only 32 and wont run a 64bit OS only the AMD 64. But it be better to get a new S939 3500+ you will see a BIG change in speed. A hell a lot faster.

  9. #19
    Linux Engineer LondoJowo's Avatar
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    I would recommend that you stick with RedStorm as it will protect you from going too far. One thing if you notice the cpu temp getting over 60c you need to get a better CPU heatsink/fan. I was able to overclock my 2500+ using the stock heatsink/fan, in fact I went to a more quieter model.

  10. #20
    Linux User George Harrison's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LondoJowo
    I would recommend that you stick with RedStorm as it will protect you from going too far. One thing if you notice the cpu temp getting over 60c you need to get a better CPU heatsink/fan. I was able to overclock my 2500+ using the stock heatsink/fan, in fact I went to a more quieter model.
    So you're saying that RedStorm will raise me to a 3200+ if I have good enough RAM or that RedStorm limits you from doing stupid stuff?

    Thanks for the reply Duffman, I was getting kinda confused by if the proc was virtually a 3200 or truely a 3200.

    EDIT: Here is that PC3200 Kingston RAM I was talking about. I'm thinking about getting it if it'll work.
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